Application of 13C NMR to investigate the transformations and biodegradation of organic materials by wood- and soil-feeding termites, and a coprophagous litter-dwelling dipteran larva

D W Hopkins, J A Chudek, D E Bignell, J Frouz, E A Webster, T Lawson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to characterize the C in samples of the food (wood), gut contents and faeces from the wood-feeding termite, Microcerotermes parvus; soil in the guts and mound material from the soil-feeding termite, Thoracotermes macrothorax; and the food and faeces from the litter-feeding, coprophagous larvae of the dipteran fly, Bibio marci. Spectra from the wood-feeding termite indicated preferential loss of polysaccharide and accumulation of lignin with some modification to the O-aromatic-C and methoxyl-C (O-methyl-C) components during passage through the gut. Spectra for the soil-feeding termite indicated little change in the distribution of 13C between resonances following passage through the gut, except for some evidence of preferential polysaccharide loss. Interpretation of the spectra from these organisms was restricted by the relatively low C content of the soils and mound material, and by the large contribution to the NMR spectra from the gut tissue rather than the gut contents. Spectra for the litter-feeding dipteran larvae indicated preferential feeding on the polysaccharide-rich component of the litter and then overall loss of polysaccharide-C and accumulation of both aromatic-C and methoxyl-C in the gut. These changes were greater for the second passage than for the first passage through the gut, suggesting that principally mechanical and physical changes occurred initially and that chemical digestion was prevalent during the second passage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)423-431
Number of pages9
JournalBiodegradation
Volume9
Issue number6
Publication statusPrint publication - 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Isoptera
termite
Biodegradation
Polysaccharides
Larva
nuclear magnetic resonance
biodegradation
Wood
litter
Soil
Nuclear magnetic resonance
larva
Soils
polysaccharide
Feces
soil
Food
Lignin
feces
Diptera

Keywords

  • Animals
  • Environmental biodegradation
  • Biotransformation
  • Carbon isotopes
  • Diptera
  • Feces chemistry
  • Feeding behaviour
  • Isoptera metabolism
  • Larva metabolism
  • Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
  • Soil parasitology
  • Wood

Cite this

@article{3c7d9525a02547d680ef904c07c67e54,
title = "Application of 13C NMR to investigate the transformations and biodegradation of organic materials by wood- and soil-feeding termites, and a coprophagous litter-dwelling dipteran larva",
abstract = "Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to characterize the C in samples of the food (wood), gut contents and faeces from the wood-feeding termite, Microcerotermes parvus; soil in the guts and mound material from the soil-feeding termite, Thoracotermes macrothorax; and the food and faeces from the litter-feeding, coprophagous larvae of the dipteran fly, Bibio marci. Spectra from the wood-feeding termite indicated preferential loss of polysaccharide and accumulation of lignin with some modification to the O-aromatic-C and methoxyl-C (O-methyl-C) components during passage through the gut. Spectra for the soil-feeding termite indicated little change in the distribution of 13C between resonances following passage through the gut, except for some evidence of preferential polysaccharide loss. Interpretation of the spectra from these organisms was restricted by the relatively low C content of the soils and mound material, and by the large contribution to the NMR spectra from the gut tissue rather than the gut contents. Spectra for the litter-feeding dipteran larvae indicated preferential feeding on the polysaccharide-rich component of the litter and then overall loss of polysaccharide-C and accumulation of both aromatic-C and methoxyl-C in the gut. These changes were greater for the second passage than for the first passage through the gut, suggesting that principally mechanical and physical changes occurred initially and that chemical digestion was prevalent during the second passage.",
keywords = "Animals, Environmental biodegradation, Biotransformation, Carbon isotopes, Diptera, Feces chemistry, Feeding behaviour, Isoptera metabolism, Larva metabolism, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Soil parasitology, Wood",
author = "Hopkins, {D W} and Chudek, {J A} and Bignell, {D E} and J Frouz and Webster, {E A} and T Lawson",
year = "1998",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "423--431",
journal = "Biodegradation",
issn = "0923-9820",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "6",

}

Application of 13C NMR to investigate the transformations and biodegradation of organic materials by wood- and soil-feeding termites, and a coprophagous litter-dwelling dipteran larva. / Hopkins, D W; Chudek, J A; Bignell, D E; Frouz, J; Webster, E A; Lawson, T.

In: Biodegradation, Vol. 9, No. 6, 1998, p. 423-431.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Application of 13C NMR to investigate the transformations and biodegradation of organic materials by wood- and soil-feeding termites, and a coprophagous litter-dwelling dipteran larva

AU - Hopkins, D W

AU - Chudek, J A

AU - Bignell, D E

AU - Frouz, J

AU - Webster, E A

AU - Lawson, T

PY - 1998

Y1 - 1998

N2 - Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to characterize the C in samples of the food (wood), gut contents and faeces from the wood-feeding termite, Microcerotermes parvus; soil in the guts and mound material from the soil-feeding termite, Thoracotermes macrothorax; and the food and faeces from the litter-feeding, coprophagous larvae of the dipteran fly, Bibio marci. Spectra from the wood-feeding termite indicated preferential loss of polysaccharide and accumulation of lignin with some modification to the O-aromatic-C and methoxyl-C (O-methyl-C) components during passage through the gut. Spectra for the soil-feeding termite indicated little change in the distribution of 13C between resonances following passage through the gut, except for some evidence of preferential polysaccharide loss. Interpretation of the spectra from these organisms was restricted by the relatively low C content of the soils and mound material, and by the large contribution to the NMR spectra from the gut tissue rather than the gut contents. Spectra for the litter-feeding dipteran larvae indicated preferential feeding on the polysaccharide-rich component of the litter and then overall loss of polysaccharide-C and accumulation of both aromatic-C and methoxyl-C in the gut. These changes were greater for the second passage than for the first passage through the gut, suggesting that principally mechanical and physical changes occurred initially and that chemical digestion was prevalent during the second passage.

AB - Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to characterize the C in samples of the food (wood), gut contents and faeces from the wood-feeding termite, Microcerotermes parvus; soil in the guts and mound material from the soil-feeding termite, Thoracotermes macrothorax; and the food and faeces from the litter-feeding, coprophagous larvae of the dipteran fly, Bibio marci. Spectra from the wood-feeding termite indicated preferential loss of polysaccharide and accumulation of lignin with some modification to the O-aromatic-C and methoxyl-C (O-methyl-C) components during passage through the gut. Spectra for the soil-feeding termite indicated little change in the distribution of 13C between resonances following passage through the gut, except for some evidence of preferential polysaccharide loss. Interpretation of the spectra from these organisms was restricted by the relatively low C content of the soils and mound material, and by the large contribution to the NMR spectra from the gut tissue rather than the gut contents. Spectra for the litter-feeding dipteran larvae indicated preferential feeding on the polysaccharide-rich component of the litter and then overall loss of polysaccharide-C and accumulation of both aromatic-C and methoxyl-C in the gut. These changes were greater for the second passage than for the first passage through the gut, suggesting that principally mechanical and physical changes occurred initially and that chemical digestion was prevalent during the second passage.

KW - Animals

KW - Environmental biodegradation

KW - Biotransformation

KW - Carbon isotopes

KW - Diptera

KW - Feces chemistry

KW - Feeding behaviour

KW - Isoptera metabolism

KW - Larva metabolism

KW - Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

KW - Soil parasitology

KW - Wood

M3 - Article

VL - 9

SP - 423

EP - 431

JO - Biodegradation

JF - Biodegradation

SN - 0923-9820

IS - 6

ER -