Assessing and managing intensification in smallholder dairy systems for food and nutrition security in Sub-Saharan Africa

MGG Chagunda, A Mwangwela, C Mumba, F dos Anjos, BS Kawonga, Richard Hopkins, L Chiwona-Kartun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Smallholder farmers play an important part in the dairy value chain in Sub-Saharan Africa. Three technological approaches have been used to improve productivity. These are through, applying agricultural ecological processes (ecological intensification), utilising modern livestock breeding (genetic intensification), and socio-economic intensification. Ecological intensification includes continuous housing of cows applying a cut-and-carry feeding system, introduction of purpose-bred forages and pastures, and the introduction of agro-forestry within the dairy systems. Genetic intensification strategies include: importation of dairy breeds such as Holstein–Friesian (HF) and cross-breeding of the indigenous breeds with HF. Training and capacity-building activities to create sustainable livelihoods have been initiated for farming and technological practices of animal husbandry, but also to enhance appropriate leadership and corporative-building skills that would create and support an enabling environment for sustainability. These improvements and initiatives in the service delivery have been championed by national governments, development partner institutions, or non-governmental organisations through different programmes. Challenges of intensification include matching management to genetic potential of imported and cross-bred improved dairy breeds, ensuring low post-harvest losses, proper utilisation, and reducing environmental impact. Using examples from Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, and Zambia, this paper reviews the management and assessment approaches used in fostering smallholder dairy development strategies and dairy’s contribution to sustainable livelihoods in the face of intensification.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2257 - 2267
Number of pages11
JournalRegional Environmental Change
Volume16
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusFirst published - 2015

Fingerprint

Sub-Saharan Africa
dairy breeds
dairies
nutrition
livelihood
breeds
postharvest losses
nongovernmental organizations
Mozambique
Malawi
Zambia
livestock breeding
leadership
animal husbandry
supply chain
agroforestry
Tanzania
Kenya
socioeconomics
environmental impact

Bibliographical note

1024806

Keywords

  • Dairying
  • Smallholder
  • Sustainable intensification

Cite this

Chagunda, MGG., Mwangwela, A., Mumba, C., dos Anjos, F., Kawonga, BS., Hopkins, R., & Chiwona-Kartun, L. (2015). Assessing and managing intensification in smallholder dairy systems for food and nutrition security in Sub-Saharan Africa. Regional Environmental Change, 16(8), 2257 - 2267. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10113-015-0829-7
Chagunda, MGG ; Mwangwela, A ; Mumba, C ; dos Anjos, F ; Kawonga, BS ; Hopkins, Richard ; Chiwona-Kartun, L. / Assessing and managing intensification in smallholder dairy systems for food and nutrition security in Sub-Saharan Africa. In: Regional Environmental Change. 2015 ; Vol. 16, No. 8. pp. 2257 - 2267.
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Chagunda, MGG, Mwangwela, A, Mumba, C, dos Anjos, F, Kawonga, BS, Hopkins, R & Chiwona-Kartun, L 2015, 'Assessing and managing intensification in smallholder dairy systems for food and nutrition security in Sub-Saharan Africa', Regional Environmental Change, vol. 16, no. 8, pp. 2257 - 2267. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10113-015-0829-7

Assessing and managing intensification in smallholder dairy systems for food and nutrition security in Sub-Saharan Africa. / Chagunda, MGG; Mwangwela, A; Mumba, C; dos Anjos, F; Kawonga, BS; Hopkins, Richard; Chiwona-Kartun, L.

In: Regional Environmental Change, Vol. 16, No. 8, 2015, p. 2257 - 2267.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Smallholder farmers play an important part in the dairy value chain in Sub-Saharan Africa. Three technological approaches have been used to improve productivity. These are through, applying agricultural ecological processes (ecological intensification), utilising modern livestock breeding (genetic intensification), and socio-economic intensification. Ecological intensification includes continuous housing of cows applying a cut-and-carry feeding system, introduction of purpose-bred forages and pastures, and the introduction of agro-forestry within the dairy systems. Genetic intensification strategies include: importation of dairy breeds such as Holstein–Friesian (HF) and cross-breeding of the indigenous breeds with HF. Training and capacity-building activities to create sustainable livelihoods have been initiated for farming and technological practices of animal husbandry, but also to enhance appropriate leadership and corporative-building skills that would create and support an enabling environment for sustainability. These improvements and initiatives in the service delivery have been championed by national governments, development partner institutions, or non-governmental organisations through different programmes. Challenges of intensification include matching management to genetic potential of imported and cross-bred improved dairy breeds, ensuring low post-harvest losses, proper utilisation, and reducing environmental impact. Using examples from Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, and Zambia, this paper reviews the management and assessment approaches used in fostering smallholder dairy development strategies and dairy’s contribution to sustainable livelihoods in the face of intensification.

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