Differential effects of protein and energy scarcity on resistance to nematode parasites

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This review addresses the question whether host resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes is sensitive to metabolizable protein (MP) or metabolizable energy (ME) scarcity. Several ruminant studies have addressed this question, and with additional data from monogastric models and post-rumen infusion methodologies, there is convincing evidence that host resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes is sensitive to MP scarcity and not (moderate) ME scarcity. A possible evolutionary reason for this variation has been evoked. Attempts to dissect the role of MP and ME scarcity on resistance to parasites in ruminants is hampered by the modifying role of the rumen, as ME supplementation usually results in confounding MP supply, arising from increased microbial protein synthesis. The latter contributes less to intestinal MP than by-pass protein, and has an amino acid composition that is less compatible with that of immune proteins, compared to MP arising from animal protein sources. Thus, the largest benefits from supplementation on host resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes are expected to arise from protein-rich foods rather than from energy-rich foods. In addition, dietary protein quality in terms of level of by-pass protein and amino acid composition of resulting intestinal MP are important factors to consider in non-chemical parasite control strategies in small ruminant production systems. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41 - 49
Number of pages9
JournalSmall Ruminant Research
Volume103
Publication statusFirst published - 2012

Fingerprint

Nematoda
parasites
energy
proteins
metabolizable energy
rumen
microbial proteins
gastrointestinal nematodes
small ruminants
amino acid composition
dietary protein
ruminants
production technology
protein synthesis
animals

Bibliographical note

66000009
66000013
56020007
56050004
56090005

Keywords

  • Amino acids
  • Energy
  • Gastrointestinal nematodes
  • Monogastrics
  • Nutrition
  • Protein
  • Small ruminants

Cite this

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title = "Differential effects of protein and energy scarcity on resistance to nematode parasites",
abstract = "This review addresses the question whether host resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes is sensitive to metabolizable protein (MP) or metabolizable energy (ME) scarcity. Several ruminant studies have addressed this question, and with additional data from monogastric models and post-rumen infusion methodologies, there is convincing evidence that host resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes is sensitive to MP scarcity and not (moderate) ME scarcity. A possible evolutionary reason for this variation has been evoked. Attempts to dissect the role of MP and ME scarcity on resistance to parasites in ruminants is hampered by the modifying role of the rumen, as ME supplementation usually results in confounding MP supply, arising from increased microbial protein synthesis. The latter contributes less to intestinal MP than by-pass protein, and has an amino acid composition that is less compatible with that of immune proteins, compared to MP arising from animal protein sources. Thus, the largest benefits from supplementation on host resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes are expected to arise from protein-rich foods rather than from energy-rich foods. In addition, dietary protein quality in terms of level of by-pass protein and amino acid composition of resulting intestinal MP are important factors to consider in non-chemical parasite control strategies in small ruminant production systems. {\circledC} 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
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Differential effects of protein and energy scarcity on resistance to nematode parasites. / Houdijk, JGM.

In: Small Ruminant Research, Vol. 103, 2012, p. 41 - 49.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Differential effects of protein and energy scarcity on resistance to nematode parasites

AU - Houdijk, JGM

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AB - This review addresses the question whether host resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes is sensitive to metabolizable protein (MP) or metabolizable energy (ME) scarcity. Several ruminant studies have addressed this question, and with additional data from monogastric models and post-rumen infusion methodologies, there is convincing evidence that host resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes is sensitive to MP scarcity and not (moderate) ME scarcity. A possible evolutionary reason for this variation has been evoked. Attempts to dissect the role of MP and ME scarcity on resistance to parasites in ruminants is hampered by the modifying role of the rumen, as ME supplementation usually results in confounding MP supply, arising from increased microbial protein synthesis. The latter contributes less to intestinal MP than by-pass protein, and has an amino acid composition that is less compatible with that of immune proteins, compared to MP arising from animal protein sources. Thus, the largest benefits from supplementation on host resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes are expected to arise from protein-rich foods rather than from energy-rich foods. In addition, dietary protein quality in terms of level of by-pass protein and amino acid composition of resulting intestinal MP are important factors to consider in non-chemical parasite control strategies in small ruminant production systems. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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KW - Nutrition

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KW - Small ruminants

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