Effect of progressive inoculation of fauna-free sheep with holotrich protozoa and total-fauna on rumen fermentation, microbial diversity and methane emissions

Alejandro Belanche, Gabriel de la Fuente, Charles J Newbold

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)
6 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Rumen methanogenesis represents an energy waste for the ruminant and an important source of greenhouse gas; thus, integrated studies are needed to fully understand this process. Eight fauna-free sheep were used to investigate the effect of successive inoculation with holotrich protozoa then with total fauna on rumen methanogenesis. Holotrichs inoculation neither altered rumen fermentation rate nor diet digestibility, but increased concentrations of acetate (+15%), butyrate (+57%), anaerobic fungi (+0.82 log), methanogens (+0.41 log) and methanogenesis (+54%). Further inoculation with total fauna increased rumen concentrations of protozoa (+1.0 log), bacteria (+0.29 log), anaerobic fungi (+0.78 log), VFA (+8%), ammonia and fibre digestibility (+17%) without affecting levels of methanogens or methanogenesis. Rumen methanogens population was fairly stable in terms of structure and diversity, while the bacterial community was highly affected by the treatments. Inoculation with holotrich protozoa increased bacterial diversity. Further inoculation with total fauna lowered bacterial diversity but increased concentrations of certain propionate and lactate-producing bacteria, suggesting that alternative H2 sinks could be relevant. This experiment suggests that holotrich protozoa have a greater impact on rumen methanogenesis than entodiniomorphids. Thus, further research is warranted to understand the effect of holotrich protozoa on methane formation and evaluate their elimination from the rumen as a potential methane mitigation strategy.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberfiu026
JournalFEMS Microbiology Ecology
Volume91
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPrint publication - Mar 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Rumen
Methane
Fermentation
Sheep
Fungi
Bacteria
Butyrates
Propionates
Ruminants
Ammonia
Lactic Acid
Acetates
Gases
Diet
Research
Population

Bibliographical note

© Federation of European Microbiological Society 2014.

Keywords

  • Ammonia/metabolism
  • Animals
  • Ciliophora/metabolism
  • Dietary Fiber
  • Euryarchaeota/metabolism
  • Fermentation/physiology
  • Fungi/metabolism
  • Host-Parasite Interactions/physiology
  • Lactic Acid/biosynthesis
  • Methane/biosynthesis
  • Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
  • Propionates/metabolism
  • Rumen/microbiology
  • Sheep/microbiology

Cite this

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title = "Effect of progressive inoculation of fauna-free sheep with holotrich protozoa and total-fauna on rumen fermentation, microbial diversity and methane emissions",
abstract = "Rumen methanogenesis represents an energy waste for the ruminant and an important source of greenhouse gas; thus, integrated studies are needed to fully understand this process. Eight fauna-free sheep were used to investigate the effect of successive inoculation with holotrich protozoa then with total fauna on rumen methanogenesis. Holotrichs inoculation neither altered rumen fermentation rate nor diet digestibility, but increased concentrations of acetate (+15{\%}), butyrate (+57{\%}), anaerobic fungi (+0.82 log), methanogens (+0.41 log) and methanogenesis (+54{\%}). Further inoculation with total fauna increased rumen concentrations of protozoa (+1.0 log), bacteria (+0.29 log), anaerobic fungi (+0.78 log), VFA (+8{\%}), ammonia and fibre digestibility (+17{\%}) without affecting levels of methanogens or methanogenesis. Rumen methanogens population was fairly stable in terms of structure and diversity, while the bacterial community was highly affected by the treatments. Inoculation with holotrich protozoa increased bacterial diversity. Further inoculation with total fauna lowered bacterial diversity but increased concentrations of certain propionate and lactate-producing bacteria, suggesting that alternative H2 sinks could be relevant. This experiment suggests that holotrich protozoa have a greater impact on rumen methanogenesis than entodiniomorphids. Thus, further research is warranted to understand the effect of holotrich protozoa on methane formation and evaluate their elimination from the rumen as a potential methane mitigation strategy.",
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Effect of progressive inoculation of fauna-free sheep with holotrich protozoa and total-fauna on rumen fermentation, microbial diversity and methane emissions. / Belanche, Alejandro; de la Fuente, Gabriel; Newbold, Charles J.

In: FEMS Microbiology Ecology, Vol. 91, No. 3, fiu026, 03.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of progressive inoculation of fauna-free sheep with holotrich protozoa and total-fauna on rumen fermentation, microbial diversity and methane emissions

AU - Belanche, Alejandro

AU - de la Fuente, Gabriel

AU - Newbold, Charles J

N1 - © Federation of European Microbiological Society 2014.

PY - 2015/3

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AB - Rumen methanogenesis represents an energy waste for the ruminant and an important source of greenhouse gas; thus, integrated studies are needed to fully understand this process. Eight fauna-free sheep were used to investigate the effect of successive inoculation with holotrich protozoa then with total fauna on rumen methanogenesis. Holotrichs inoculation neither altered rumen fermentation rate nor diet digestibility, but increased concentrations of acetate (+15%), butyrate (+57%), anaerobic fungi (+0.82 log), methanogens (+0.41 log) and methanogenesis (+54%). Further inoculation with total fauna increased rumen concentrations of protozoa (+1.0 log), bacteria (+0.29 log), anaerobic fungi (+0.78 log), VFA (+8%), ammonia and fibre digestibility (+17%) without affecting levels of methanogens or methanogenesis. Rumen methanogens population was fairly stable in terms of structure and diversity, while the bacterial community was highly affected by the treatments. Inoculation with holotrich protozoa increased bacterial diversity. Further inoculation with total fauna lowered bacterial diversity but increased concentrations of certain propionate and lactate-producing bacteria, suggesting that alternative H2 sinks could be relevant. This experiment suggests that holotrich protozoa have a greater impact on rumen methanogenesis than entodiniomorphids. Thus, further research is warranted to understand the effect of holotrich protozoa on methane formation and evaluate their elimination from the rumen as a potential methane mitigation strategy.

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KW - Animals

KW - Ciliophora/metabolism

KW - Dietary Fiber

KW - Euryarchaeota/metabolism

KW - Fermentation/physiology

KW - Fungi/metabolism

KW - Host-Parasite Interactions/physiology

KW - Lactic Acid/biosynthesis

KW - Methane/biosynthesis

KW - Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length

KW - Propionates/metabolism

KW - Rumen/microbiology

KW - Sheep/microbiology

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DO - 10.1093/femsec/fiu026

M3 - Article

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VL - 91

JO - FEMS Microbiology Ecology

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SN - 0168-6496

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