Effect of supplementation with selenium on whole blood glutathione peroxidase activities and on plasma and tissue selenium concentrations in lambs

Jeannette Molnár, Allan Macpherson, James Dixon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In recent years the selenium (Se) intake of the human population of the UK has shown a marked decline from 60 μg/d in 1978 to around 30 μg/d in 1990 owing largely to a significant reduction in the importation of North American wheat for bread-making flour. Other countries (Finland, for example) in similar situations have instituted fertilization programs in order to raise cereal Se concentrations and thus boost dietary intakes. An alternative approach would be to increase the Se concentration of carcass meat by supplementation of meat animals for a limited period prior to slaughter. A trial was set up with store lambs to evaluate this approach. Sixteen Scottish Blackface lambs were stratified according to live weight and then randomly allocated to one of four treatments: unsupplemented, or 3.5, 7, or 10.5 mg Se/head/wk. After 14 wk, the lambs were sacrificed and samples of shoulder and thigh muscle, liver, and kidney were obtained for analysis. All three treatments effected an increase in whole blood glutathione peroxidase (GSH- Px) and plasma Se concentrations over controls. Shoulder, thigh, and liver Se exhibited a dose-response relationship to treatment, but kidney Se concentrations were unaffected by treatment. Muscle and some organ meat Se concentrations can therefore be increased by supplementation and could contribute to increased human dietary intakes of the element.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)253-262
Number of pages10
JournalBiological Trace Element Research
Volume55
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPrint publication - 1 Jan 1996

Keywords

  • glutathione peroxidase
  • human dietary intake
  • lambs
  • Selenium
  • selenium supplementation

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