Effects of dietary starch source and buffers on milk responses and rumen fatty acid biohydrogenation in dairy cows fed maize silage-based diets

ARJ Cabrita*, JMP Vale, RJB Bessa, RJ Dewhurst, AJM Fonseca

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Effects of dietary starch source and buffers on milk responses and rumen fatty acid biohydrogenation of dairy cows fed maize silage-based diets were evaluated using 16 Holstein cows in an incomplete 4 × 4 Latin Square-design experiment with three periods. Each experimental period lasted for 3 weeks. The diets fed as a total mixed ration consisted (dry matter basis) of 450 g/kg maize silage, 50 g/kg coarsely chopped wheat straw and 500 g/kg concentrate. The four dietary treatments were formulated to be isonitrogenous, iso-starch, and to differ in the main starch source in the concentrate and the addition of buffers and neutralizing substances (B: sodium bicarbonate and magnesium oxide). Diets were formulated with concentrates based on wheat with (WB) or without B (W), or with concentrates based on maize with (MB) or without B (M). Dietary treatments did not affect dry matter intake, and maize-based concentrates tended to increase milk production—probably due to the different profile of end products of digestion. Addition of buffers did not affect productive responses. Dietary treatments had only small effect on most milk fatty acids. Maize diets induced lower 16:0, 16:1 cis-9 and odd-chain fatty acids (13:0, 15:0, 17:0 and 17:1 cis-9) and higher total C18 fatty acids than wheat diets. Results did not confirm the anticipated effect of rate of ruminal starch degradation on milk 18:1 trans-10. Dietary buffers led to more complete rumen biohydrogenation, with a decrease in almost all biohydrogenation intermediates, including rumenic acid. Explanations for effects of dietary buffers on rumen biohydrogenation pattern are needed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)267-277
JournalAnimal Feed Science and Technology
Volume152
Issue number3-4
Publication statusPrint publication - Aug 2009

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biohydrogenation
dietary carbohydrate
corn silage
rumen
buffers
dairy cows
concentrates
fatty acids
milk
diet
starch
corn
odd chain fatty acids
magnesium oxide
wheat
total mixed rations
sodium bicarbonate
conjugated linoleic acid
wheat straw
neutralization

Cite this

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title = "Effects of dietary starch source and buffers on milk responses and rumen fatty acid biohydrogenation in dairy cows fed maize silage-based diets",
abstract = "Effects of dietary starch source and buffers on milk responses and rumen fatty acid biohydrogenation of dairy cows fed maize silage-based diets were evaluated using 16 Holstein cows in an incomplete 4 × 4 Latin Square-design experiment with three periods. Each experimental period lasted for 3 weeks. The diets fed as a total mixed ration consisted (dry matter basis) of 450 g/kg maize silage, 50 g/kg coarsely chopped wheat straw and 500 g/kg concentrate. The four dietary treatments were formulated to be isonitrogenous, iso-starch, and to differ in the main starch source in the concentrate and the addition of buffers and neutralizing substances (B: sodium bicarbonate and magnesium oxide). Diets were formulated with concentrates based on wheat with (WB) or without B (W), or with concentrates based on maize with (MB) or without B (M). Dietary treatments did not affect dry matter intake, and maize-based concentrates tended to increase milk production—probably due to the different profile of end products of digestion. Addition of buffers did not affect productive responses. Dietary treatments had only small effect on most milk fatty acids. Maize diets induced lower 16:0, 16:1 cis-9 and odd-chain fatty acids (13:0, 15:0, 17:0 and 17:1 cis-9) and higher total C18 fatty acids than wheat diets. Results did not confirm the anticipated effect of rate of ruminal starch degradation on milk 18:1 trans-10. Dietary buffers led to more complete rumen biohydrogenation, with a decrease in almost all biohydrogenation intermediates, including rumenic acid. Explanations for effects of dietary buffers on rumen biohydrogenation pattern are needed.",
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Effects of dietary starch source and buffers on milk responses and rumen fatty acid biohydrogenation in dairy cows fed maize silage-based diets. / Cabrita, ARJ; Vale, JMP; Bessa, RJB; Dewhurst, RJ; Fonseca, AJM.

In: Animal Feed Science and Technology, Vol. 152, No. 3-4, 08.2009, p. 267-277.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of dietary starch source and buffers on milk responses and rumen fatty acid biohydrogenation in dairy cows fed maize silage-based diets

AU - Cabrita, ARJ

AU - Vale, JMP

AU - Bessa, RJB

AU - Dewhurst, RJ

AU - Fonseca, AJM

PY - 2009/8

Y1 - 2009/8

N2 - Effects of dietary starch source and buffers on milk responses and rumen fatty acid biohydrogenation of dairy cows fed maize silage-based diets were evaluated using 16 Holstein cows in an incomplete 4 × 4 Latin Square-design experiment with three periods. Each experimental period lasted for 3 weeks. The diets fed as a total mixed ration consisted (dry matter basis) of 450 g/kg maize silage, 50 g/kg coarsely chopped wheat straw and 500 g/kg concentrate. The four dietary treatments were formulated to be isonitrogenous, iso-starch, and to differ in the main starch source in the concentrate and the addition of buffers and neutralizing substances (B: sodium bicarbonate and magnesium oxide). Diets were formulated with concentrates based on wheat with (WB) or without B (W), or with concentrates based on maize with (MB) or without B (M). Dietary treatments did not affect dry matter intake, and maize-based concentrates tended to increase milk production—probably due to the different profile of end products of digestion. Addition of buffers did not affect productive responses. Dietary treatments had only small effect on most milk fatty acids. Maize diets induced lower 16:0, 16:1 cis-9 and odd-chain fatty acids (13:0, 15:0, 17:0 and 17:1 cis-9) and higher total C18 fatty acids than wheat diets. Results did not confirm the anticipated effect of rate of ruminal starch degradation on milk 18:1 trans-10. Dietary buffers led to more complete rumen biohydrogenation, with a decrease in almost all biohydrogenation intermediates, including rumenic acid. Explanations for effects of dietary buffers on rumen biohydrogenation pattern are needed.

AB - Effects of dietary starch source and buffers on milk responses and rumen fatty acid biohydrogenation of dairy cows fed maize silage-based diets were evaluated using 16 Holstein cows in an incomplete 4 × 4 Latin Square-design experiment with three periods. Each experimental period lasted for 3 weeks. The diets fed as a total mixed ration consisted (dry matter basis) of 450 g/kg maize silage, 50 g/kg coarsely chopped wheat straw and 500 g/kg concentrate. The four dietary treatments were formulated to be isonitrogenous, iso-starch, and to differ in the main starch source in the concentrate and the addition of buffers and neutralizing substances (B: sodium bicarbonate and magnesium oxide). Diets were formulated with concentrates based on wheat with (WB) or without B (W), or with concentrates based on maize with (MB) or without B (M). Dietary treatments did not affect dry matter intake, and maize-based concentrates tended to increase milk production—probably due to the different profile of end products of digestion. Addition of buffers did not affect productive responses. Dietary treatments had only small effect on most milk fatty acids. Maize diets induced lower 16:0, 16:1 cis-9 and odd-chain fatty acids (13:0, 15:0, 17:0 and 17:1 cis-9) and higher total C18 fatty acids than wheat diets. Results did not confirm the anticipated effect of rate of ruminal starch degradation on milk 18:1 trans-10. Dietary buffers led to more complete rumen biohydrogenation, with a decrease in almost all biohydrogenation intermediates, including rumenic acid. Explanations for effects of dietary buffers on rumen biohydrogenation pattern are needed.

UR - https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anifeedsci.2009.04.020

M3 - Article

VL - 152

SP - 267

EP - 277

JO - Animal Feed Science and Technology

JF - Animal Feed Science and Technology

SN - 0377-8401

IS - 3-4

ER -