Existing infection with Rhynchosporium secalis compromises the ability of barley to express induced resistance

DR Walters, L Paterson, C Sablou, DJ Walsh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It has been suggested that if plants in the field are already induced, their ability to further enhance induced resistance might be compromised. This was examined in barley by inoculating the first two leaves with Rhynchosporium secalis prior to treatment of leaves three and four with an elicitor combination, followed by inoculation with R. secalis. The elicitor combination used consisted of acibenzolar-S-methyl, β-aminobutyric acid, and cis-jasmone, which was shown previously to provide higher levels of disease control in barley than any of the components used individually. The elicitor combination reduced infection by R. secalis, and led to an up-regulation of PR1-b, a marker gene for systemic acquired resistance, and increased activities of the defence-related enzymes cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD), peroxidase (POX), and β-1,3-glucanase. It also led to down-regulation of LOX2, a gene involved in biosynthesis of jasmonic acid. In plants where the first two leaves were inoculated with R. secalis prior to treatment of leaves three and four with elicitor, these increased defence responses did not occur, and control of R. secalis infection on leaves three and four was also reduced. These results suggest that, at least in young barley plants, prior infection with R. secalis compromises their ability to respond effectively to elicitors. The results might help to explain the relatively poor performance of induced resistance in the field, particularly in cereals, compared to plants grown under controlled conditions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73 - 82
Number of pages10
JournalEuropean Journal of Plant Pathology
Volume130
DOIs
Publication statusFirst published - 2011

Fingerprint

Rhynchosporium secalis
induced resistance
barley
infection
leaves
cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase
systemic acquired resistance
jasmonic acid
disease control
peroxidase
elicitors
biosynthesis
genetic markers
acids
enzymes

Bibliographical note

62700028

Keywords

  • Barley
  • Infection
  • Resistance
  • Rhynchosporium secalis

Cite this

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title = "Existing infection with Rhynchosporium secalis compromises the ability of barley to express induced resistance",
abstract = "It has been suggested that if plants in the field are already induced, their ability to further enhance induced resistance might be compromised. This was examined in barley by inoculating the first two leaves with Rhynchosporium secalis prior to treatment of leaves three and four with an elicitor combination, followed by inoculation with R. secalis. The elicitor combination used consisted of acibenzolar-S-methyl, β-aminobutyric acid, and cis-jasmone, which was shown previously to provide higher levels of disease control in barley than any of the components used individually. The elicitor combination reduced infection by R. secalis, and led to an up-regulation of PR1-b, a marker gene for systemic acquired resistance, and increased activities of the defence-related enzymes cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD), peroxidase (POX), and β-1,3-glucanase. It also led to down-regulation of LOX2, a gene involved in biosynthesis of jasmonic acid. In plants where the first two leaves were inoculated with R. secalis prior to treatment of leaves three and four with elicitor, these increased defence responses did not occur, and control of R. secalis infection on leaves three and four was also reduced. These results suggest that, at least in young barley plants, prior infection with R. secalis compromises their ability to respond effectively to elicitors. The results might help to explain the relatively poor performance of induced resistance in the field, particularly in cereals, compared to plants grown under controlled conditions.",
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Existing infection with Rhynchosporium secalis compromises the ability of barley to express induced resistance. / Walters, DR; Paterson, L; Sablou, C; Walsh, DJ.

In: European Journal of Plant Pathology, Vol. 130, 2011, p. 73 - 82.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Paterson, L

AU - Sablou, C

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