Facile pretreatment strategies to biotransform Kans grass into nanocatalyst, cellulolytic enzymes, and fermentable sugars towards sustainable biorefinery applications

Preeti Singh, Neha Srivastava, Akbar Mohammad, Basant Lal, Rajeev Singh, Asad Syed, Abdallah M. Elgorban, Meenakshi Verma, P. K. Mishra, Vijai Kumar Gupta*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The present investigation is targeted towards the facile fabrication of a carbon-based nanocatalyst (CNCs) using Kans grass biomass (KGB) and its sustainable application in microbial cellulase enhancement for the alleviation of enzymatic hydrolysis for sugar production. Different pretreatments, including physical, KGB extract-mediated treatment, followed by KOH pretreatment, have been applied to produce CNCs using KGB. The presence of CNCs influences the pretreatment of KGB substrate, fungal cellulase production, stability, and sugar recovery in the enzymatic hydrolysis of KGB. Using 1.0% CNCs pretreated KGB-based solid-state fermentation, 33 U/gds FPA and 126 U/gds BGL were obtained at 72 h, followed by 107 U/gds EG at 48 h in the presence of 0.5% CNCs. Further, 42 °C has been identified as the optimum temperature for cellulase production, while the enzyme showed thermal stability at 50 °C up to 20 h and produced 38.4 g/L sugar in 24 h through enzymatic hydrolysis of KGB.

Original languageEnglish
Article number129491
JournalBioresource Technology
Volume386
Early online date16 Jul 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPrint publication - Oct 2023

Bibliographical note

Copyright © 2023 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Cellulolytic enzymes
  • Lignocellulosic biomass
  • Nanocatalyst
  • Pretreatment process
  • Reducing sugars
  • Carbohydrates
  • Temperature
  • Biomass
  • Fermentation
  • Hydrolysis
  • Cellulase/metabolism
  • Poaceae/metabolism
  • Sugars

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