From welcome culture to welcome limits? Uncovering preference changes over time for sheltering refugees in Germany

U Liebe, J Meyerhoff, M Kroesen, C Chorus, K Glenk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Europe recently experienced a large influx of refugees, spurring much public debate about the admission and integration of refugees and migrants into society. Previous research based on cross-sectional data found that European citizens generally favour asylum seekers with high employability, severe vulnerabilities, and Christians over Muslims. These preferences and attitudes were found to be homogeneous across countries and socio-demographic groups. Here, we do not study the general acceptance of asylum seekers, but the acceptance of refugee and migrant homes in citizens’ vicinity and how it changes over time. Based on a repeated stated choice experiment on preferences for refugee and migrant homes, we show that the initially promoted “welcome culture” towards refugees in Germany was not reflected in the views of a majority of a sample of German citizens who rather disapproved refugee homes in their vicinity. Their preferences have not changed between November 2015, the peak of “welcome culture,” and November 2016, after political debates, media reporting and public discourse had shifted towards limiting admission of immigrants. A minority of one fifth of the sample population, who were initially rather approving of refugee and migrant homes being established in their vicinity, were more likely to change their preferences towards a rather disapproving position in 2016. Experience of contact with refugees and migrants, higher education, and general pro-immigration attitudes explain acceptance of refugee and migrant homes as well as preference stability over time. Country of origin and religion of refugees and migrants are considered less important than decent housing conditions and whether refugee and migrants arrive as families or single persons. In this respect our results highlight the importance of humanitarian aspects of sheltering and integration of refugees and other migrants into society.
Original languageEnglish
Article number0199923
Pages (from-to)1 - 6
Number of pages6
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume13
Issue number8
Early online date1 Aug 2018
DOIs
Publication statusFirst published - 1 Aug 2018

Fingerprint

refugee
migrant
acceptance
asylum seeker
citizen
time
housing conditions
employability
country of origin
Muslim
immigration
vulnerability
Religion
immigrant
minority
contact
human being
discourse
experiment

Bibliographical note

1020301

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Altruism
  • Attitude
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Female
  • Germany
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Refugees
  • Religion
  • Residence Characteristics
  • Transients and Migrants

Cite this

Liebe, U ; Meyerhoff, J ; Kroesen, M ; Chorus, C ; Glenk, K. / From welcome culture to welcome limits? Uncovering preference changes over time for sheltering refugees in Germany. In: PLoS ONE. 2018 ; Vol. 13, No. 8. pp. 1 - 6.
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From welcome culture to welcome limits? Uncovering preference changes over time for sheltering refugees in Germany. / Liebe, U; Meyerhoff, J; Kroesen, M; Chorus, C; Glenk, K.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 13, No. 8, 0199923, 01.08.2018, p. 1 - 6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Meyerhoff, J

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AU - Chorus, C

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AB - Europe recently experienced a large influx of refugees, spurring much public debate about the admission and integration of refugees and migrants into society. Previous research based on cross-sectional data found that European citizens generally favour asylum seekers with high employability, severe vulnerabilities, and Christians over Muslims. These preferences and attitudes were found to be homogeneous across countries and socio-demographic groups. Here, we do not study the general acceptance of asylum seekers, but the acceptance of refugee and migrant homes in citizens’ vicinity and how it changes over time. Based on a repeated stated choice experiment on preferences for refugee and migrant homes, we show that the initially promoted “welcome culture” towards refugees in Germany was not reflected in the views of a majority of a sample of German citizens who rather disapproved refugee homes in their vicinity. Their preferences have not changed between November 2015, the peak of “welcome culture,” and November 2016, after political debates, media reporting and public discourse had shifted towards limiting admission of immigrants. A minority of one fifth of the sample population, who were initially rather approving of refugee and migrant homes being established in their vicinity, were more likely to change their preferences towards a rather disapproving position in 2016. Experience of contact with refugees and migrants, higher education, and general pro-immigration attitudes explain acceptance of refugee and migrant homes as well as preference stability over time. Country of origin and religion of refugees and migrants are considered less important than decent housing conditions and whether refugee and migrants arrive as families or single persons. In this respect our results highlight the importance of humanitarian aspects of sheltering and integration of refugees and other migrants into society.

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