Genetic relationship between first-lactation body energy and later-life udder health in dairy cattle

G Banos, MP Coffey, E Wall, S Brotherstone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Weekly body condition score (BCS) and live weight records were used to calculate energy content (EC) and cumulative effective energy balance (CEEB) for 508 Holstein-Friesian cows in their first lactation. Cows were raised on an experimental farm and had calved between 1991 and 2000. Energy content was an estimate of the actual energy level of a cow at any given stage of lactation, whereas CEEB was associated with the total body energy content as defined by accumulated weekly energy balance changes since the onset of lactation. Genetic evaluations were computed for the 3 body energy traits (BCS, EC, and CEEB) for each week of first lactation. Random regression models were used to assess the association between first-lactation weekly genetic evaluations for body energy and monthly test-day log-transformed SCC, clinical mastitis, and other udder problems in the first 3 lactations. There was a significant effect of at least one body energy trait at any stage of first lactation past wk 3 on SCC in the first 3 lactations. Maximum genetic correlation estimates were −0.18 (±0.04) between wk-16 BCS and SCC in the first 2 lactations, −0.18 (±0.04) between wk-11 EC and SCC in the first 2 lactations, and −0.17 (±0.07) between wk-6 CEEB and SCC in the first 2 lactations. The effect of body energy traits on clinical mastitis was, in general, nonsignificant; nevertheless, moderate genetic correlations were estimated, ranging from −0.05 (±0.07) to −0.25 (±0.15). The effect of body energy traits on udder problems other than mastitis was negligible in all cases. Results suggest that, amongst the traits studied here, BCS, EC, and CEEB in the first 3 to 4 mo of lactation 1 had the greatest genetic association with SCC and mastitis in first, second, and, to a lesser extent, third lactations.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2222 - 2232
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Dairy Science
Volume89
Issue number6
Early online date2006
DOIs
Publication statusPrint publication - Jun 2006

Fingerprint

udders
genetic relationships
dairy cattle
lactation
energy
energy content
energy balance
mastitis
body condition
cows
genetic correlation
demonstration farms
lactation stage
Holstein

Bibliographical note

521155
621036

Keywords

  • Body
  • Cattle
  • Dairy
  • Dairy Cattle
  • Energy
  • Genetic
  • Health
  • Relationship
  • Udder

Cite this

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abstract = "Weekly body condition score (BCS) and live weight records were used to calculate energy content (EC) and cumulative effective energy balance (CEEB) for 508 Holstein-Friesian cows in their first lactation. Cows were raised on an experimental farm and had calved between 1991 and 2000. Energy content was an estimate of the actual energy level of a cow at any given stage of lactation, whereas CEEB was associated with the total body energy content as defined by accumulated weekly energy balance changes since the onset of lactation. Genetic evaluations were computed for the 3 body energy traits (BCS, EC, and CEEB) for each week of first lactation. Random regression models were used to assess the association between first-lactation weekly genetic evaluations for body energy and monthly test-day log-transformed SCC, clinical mastitis, and other udder problems in the first 3 lactations. There was a significant effect of at least one body energy trait at any stage of first lactation past wk 3 on SCC in the first 3 lactations. Maximum genetic correlation estimates were −0.18 (±0.04) between wk-16 BCS and SCC in the first 2 lactations, −0.18 (±0.04) between wk-11 EC and SCC in the first 2 lactations, and −0.17 (±0.07) between wk-6 CEEB and SCC in the first 2 lactations. The effect of body energy traits on clinical mastitis was, in general, nonsignificant; nevertheless, moderate genetic correlations were estimated, ranging from −0.05 (±0.07) to −0.25 (±0.15). The effect of body energy traits on udder problems other than mastitis was negligible in all cases. Results suggest that, amongst the traits studied here, BCS, EC, and CEEB in the first 3 to 4 mo of lactation 1 had the greatest genetic association with SCC and mastitis in first, second, and, to a lesser extent, third lactations.",
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Genetic relationship between first-lactation body energy and later-life udder health in dairy cattle. / Banos, G; Coffey, MP; Wall, E; Brotherstone, S.

In: Journal of Dairy Science, Vol. 89, No. 6, 06.2006, p. 2222 - 2232.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Genetic relationship between first-lactation body energy and later-life udder health in dairy cattle

AU - Banos, G

AU - Coffey, MP

AU - Wall, E

AU - Brotherstone, S

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AB - Weekly body condition score (BCS) and live weight records were used to calculate energy content (EC) and cumulative effective energy balance (CEEB) for 508 Holstein-Friesian cows in their first lactation. Cows were raised on an experimental farm and had calved between 1991 and 2000. Energy content was an estimate of the actual energy level of a cow at any given stage of lactation, whereas CEEB was associated with the total body energy content as defined by accumulated weekly energy balance changes since the onset of lactation. Genetic evaluations were computed for the 3 body energy traits (BCS, EC, and CEEB) for each week of first lactation. Random regression models were used to assess the association between first-lactation weekly genetic evaluations for body energy and monthly test-day log-transformed SCC, clinical mastitis, and other udder problems in the first 3 lactations. There was a significant effect of at least one body energy trait at any stage of first lactation past wk 3 on SCC in the first 3 lactations. Maximum genetic correlation estimates were −0.18 (±0.04) between wk-16 BCS and SCC in the first 2 lactations, −0.18 (±0.04) between wk-11 EC and SCC in the first 2 lactations, and −0.17 (±0.07) between wk-6 CEEB and SCC in the first 2 lactations. The effect of body energy traits on clinical mastitis was, in general, nonsignificant; nevertheless, moderate genetic correlations were estimated, ranging from −0.05 (±0.07) to −0.25 (±0.15). The effect of body energy traits on udder problems other than mastitis was negligible in all cases. Results suggest that, amongst the traits studied here, BCS, EC, and CEEB in the first 3 to 4 mo of lactation 1 had the greatest genetic association with SCC and mastitis in first, second, and, to a lesser extent, third lactations.

KW - Body

KW - Cattle

KW - Dairy

KW - Dairy Cattle

KW - Energy

KW - Genetic

KW - Health

KW - Relationship

KW - Udder

U2 - 10.3168/jds.2008-91-1-0442

DO - 10.3168/jds.2008-91-1-0442

M3 - Article

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