Glasshouse studies on the effect of low temperature on infection of perennial ryegrass seedlings by Fusarium nivale

S. J.I. HOLMES*, A. G. CHANNON

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In glasshouse experiments, isolates of Fusarium nivale, applied as mycelial macerates, caused marked reductions in the number and length of roots, and in the height and fresh weight of S. 321 perennial ryegrass seedlings. Spore inocula failed to cause infection. Damage by F. nivale was increased when inoculation was immediately followed by four alternate 12 h periods in a growth cabinet at 0°C and in a warm glasshouse at c. 17°C, succeeded by a further 11 days in the same glasshouse. Although inoculated seedlings receiving no cold treatments initially showed damage, regrowth of roots and some recovery of the shoots occurred in a fortnight. Exposure of the plants after that time to four intermittent 12 h periods at 0°C, however, arrested their recovery and caused further root damage. The implication of these results in the importance of low temperature in the winterkill syndrome is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-48
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Applied Biology
Volume79
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPrint publication - Jan 1975

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