Integrating hill sheep production and newly established native woodland: achieving sustainability through multiple land use in Scotland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A novel system combining hill sheep production with native woodland creation has been established in a Scottish mountain valley. This involved implementing an off-wintering regime for a Scottish Blackface ewe flock, fencing approximately one-quarter of the valley, and planting native trees within the fenced area. Comparisons between initial bio-economical modelling results and actual monitored data over five years were made, to assess the potential success of such a combined system in terms of flock economics, local labour, woodland establishment and vegetation and bird impacts. Participative research to assess public benefits (including biodiversity) and uptake by the industry was also carried out. Results showed that with the exception of the slow rate of woodland establishment, results exceeded predictions, especially for the combined system economics, where actual returns were 20% more than predicted. The public and the industry were also very supportive of such an approach (78% and 68% of them respectively). It could also be argued that there is the potential to fully integrate the system in the future by grazing within the woodland and increased use for recreation and amenity, providing evidence that such a multiple land use approach is a viable one for upland and hill areas.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)133 - 147
Number of pages15
JournalInternational Journal of Agricultural Sustainability
Volume6
Issue number2
Publication statusFirst published - 2008

Fingerprint

sheep
woodland
sustainability
land use
valley
industry
economic system
amenity
grazing
labor
biodiversity
bird
mountain
vegetation
prediction
economics
modeling
public

Bibliographical note

641024
641017
541411
541412
541410
638711
641021
64100032
wp3.1

Keywords

  • Hill sheep
  • Integration
  • Land use
  • Multiple objectives
  • Native woodland

Cite this

@article{b53302f2e23546cba9d45a0cd8c4afe1,
title = "Integrating hill sheep production and newly established native woodland: achieving sustainability through multiple land use in Scotland",
abstract = "A novel system combining hill sheep production with native woodland creation has been established in a Scottish mountain valley. This involved implementing an off-wintering regime for a Scottish Blackface ewe flock, fencing approximately one-quarter of the valley, and planting native trees within the fenced area. Comparisons between initial bio-economical modelling results and actual monitored data over five years were made, to assess the potential success of such a combined system in terms of flock economics, local labour, woodland establishment and vegetation and bird impacts. Participative research to assess public benefits (including biodiversity) and uptake by the industry was also carried out. Results showed that with the exception of the slow rate of woodland establishment, results exceeded predictions, especially for the combined system economics, where actual returns were 20{\%} more than predicted. The public and the industry were also very supportive of such an approach (78{\%} and 68{\%} of them respectively). It could also be argued that there is the potential to fully integrate the system in the future by grazing within the woodland and increased use for recreation and amenity, providing evidence that such a multiple land use approach is a viable one for upland and hill areas.",
keywords = "Hill sheep, Integration, Land use, Multiple objectives, Native woodland",
author = "C Morgan-Davies and A Waterhouse and ML Pollock and JP Holland",
note = "641024 641017 541411 541412 541410 638711 641021 64100032 wp3.1",
year = "2008",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
pages = "133 -- 147",
journal = "International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability",
issn = "1473-5903",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Integrating hill sheep production and newly established native woodland: achieving sustainability through multiple land use in Scotland

AU - Morgan-Davies, C

AU - Waterhouse, A

AU - Pollock, ML

AU - Holland, JP

N1 - 641024 641017 541411 541412 541410 638711 641021 64100032 wp3.1

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - A novel system combining hill sheep production with native woodland creation has been established in a Scottish mountain valley. This involved implementing an off-wintering regime for a Scottish Blackface ewe flock, fencing approximately one-quarter of the valley, and planting native trees within the fenced area. Comparisons between initial bio-economical modelling results and actual monitored data over five years were made, to assess the potential success of such a combined system in terms of flock economics, local labour, woodland establishment and vegetation and bird impacts. Participative research to assess public benefits (including biodiversity) and uptake by the industry was also carried out. Results showed that with the exception of the slow rate of woodland establishment, results exceeded predictions, especially for the combined system economics, where actual returns were 20% more than predicted. The public and the industry were also very supportive of such an approach (78% and 68% of them respectively). It could also be argued that there is the potential to fully integrate the system in the future by grazing within the woodland and increased use for recreation and amenity, providing evidence that such a multiple land use approach is a viable one for upland and hill areas.

AB - A novel system combining hill sheep production with native woodland creation has been established in a Scottish mountain valley. This involved implementing an off-wintering regime for a Scottish Blackface ewe flock, fencing approximately one-quarter of the valley, and planting native trees within the fenced area. Comparisons between initial bio-economical modelling results and actual monitored data over five years were made, to assess the potential success of such a combined system in terms of flock economics, local labour, woodland establishment and vegetation and bird impacts. Participative research to assess public benefits (including biodiversity) and uptake by the industry was also carried out. Results showed that with the exception of the slow rate of woodland establishment, results exceeded predictions, especially for the combined system economics, where actual returns were 20% more than predicted. The public and the industry were also very supportive of such an approach (78% and 68% of them respectively). It could also be argued that there is the potential to fully integrate the system in the future by grazing within the woodland and increased use for recreation and amenity, providing evidence that such a multiple land use approach is a viable one for upland and hill areas.

KW - Hill sheep

KW - Integration

KW - Land use

KW - Multiple objectives

KW - Native woodland

M3 - Article

VL - 6

SP - 133

EP - 147

JO - International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability

JF - International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability

SN - 1473-5903

IS - 2

ER -