Local food activity in Scotland: empirical evidence and research agenda

D Watts, PMK Leat, C Revoredo-Giha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Local food activity in Scotland:empirical evidence and research agenda, Regional Studies. This paper examines the geographyof local food activity in Scotland and combines its datawith published figures for England andWales to calculate an index of food relocalization for Great Britain. It finds that non-farm-based local food enterprises tend to concentrate in Scotland’s remotest and least densely populated areas. Farm-based enterprises cluster around the central belt,with cattle and sheep meat, horticultural and diary produce strongly represented. In the British regional context, Scotland emerges as a ‘middling’ performer. The paper discusses some possible influences on these results and reflects on their research and policy implications.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1187 - 1205
Number of pages19
JournalRegional Studies
Volume45
Issue number9
Publication statusFirst published - 2010

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Bibliographical note

63800037

Keywords

  • Food relocalization
  • Geography of Scotland

Cite this

Watts, D ; Leat, PMK ; Revoredo-Giha, C. / Local food activity in Scotland: empirical evidence and research agenda. In: Regional Studies. 2010 ; Vol. 45, No. 9. pp. 1187 - 1205.
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Local food activity in Scotland: empirical evidence and research agenda. / Watts, D; Leat, PMK; Revoredo-Giha, C.

In: Regional Studies, Vol. 45, No. 9, 2010, p. 1187 - 1205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Local food activity in Scotland:empirical evidence and research agenda, Regional Studies. This paper examines the geographyof local food activity in Scotland and combines its datawith published figures for England andWales to calculate an index of food relocalization for Great Britain. It finds that non-farm-based local food enterprises tend to concentrate in Scotland’s remotest and least densely populated areas. Farm-based enterprises cluster around the central belt,with cattle and sheep meat, horticultural and diary produce strongly represented. In the British regional context, Scotland emerges as a ‘middling’ performer. The paper discusses some possible influences on these results and reflects on their research and policy implications.

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