Meningoencephalitis in a common minke whale Balaenoptera acutorostrata associated with Brucella pinnipedialis and gamma-herpesvirus infection

Nicholas J Davison*, Mark P Dagleish, Mariel Ten Doeschate, Jakub Muchowski, Lorraine L Perrett, Mara Rocchi, Adrian M Whatmore, Andrew Brownlow

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReport/ Case Reportpeer-review

Abstract

Fatal marine Brucella infections with histologic lesions specific to the central nervous system (CNS), known as neurobrucellosis, have been described in 5 species of odontocete cetaceans in the UK: striped dolphins Stenella coeruleoalba, Atlantic white-sided dolphins Lagenorhynchus acutus, short-beaked common dolphins Delphinus delphis, long-finned pilot whale Globicephala melas and Sowerby's beaked whale Mesoplodon bidens. To date, these CNS lesions have only been associated with Brucella ceti ST26 and not with B. pinnipedialis, which is rarely isolated from cetaceans and, although commonly found in various seal species, has never been associated with any pathology. This paper describes the first report of neurobrucellosis in a common minke whale Balaenoptera acutorostrata which was associated with the isolation of Brucella pinnipedialis ST24 and co-infection with Balaenoptera acutorostrata gamma-herpesvirus 2. This is the first report of neurobrucellosis in any species of mysticete and the first report of Brucella pinnipedialis in association with any pathology in any species of marine mammal, which may be due to co-infection with a herpesvirus, as these are known to be associated with immunosuppression.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)231-235
Number of pages5
JournalDiseases of Aquatic Organisms
Volume144
DOIs
Publication statusFirst published - 27 May 2021

Keywords

  • Balaenoptera acutorostrata
  • Brucella pinnipedialis
  • Herpesvirus
  • Isolation
  • Meningoencephalitis
  • Neurobrucellosis
  • United Kingdom

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