Nutritional strategies to reduce enteric methane emissions

JA Rooke*, G A Miller, JF Flockhart, MM McDowell, M MacLeod

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

Abstract

Methane (CH4) emissions from ruminants are responsible for approximately 50% of the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with agriculture in Scotland. Reducing the emissions intensity (EI; the amount of GHG emitted per unit of meat or milk produced) of ruminants is, therefore, key to reducing agricultural
emissions in Scotland. Scottish Government commissioned ClimateXChange to carry out a rapid evidence assessment for the effectiveness of probiotics, nitrates and high fat diets in addressing enteric fermentation as a source of GHG emissions.
Original languageEnglish
PublisherScotland's Rural College (SRUC)
Commissioning bodyClimateXChange
Number of pages46
Publication statusPrint publication - 2016

Fingerprint

methane
greenhouse gas
ruminant
probiotics
meat
milk
fermentation
fat
diet
nitrate
agriculture

Bibliographical note

© Published by Scotland’s Rural College, 2016 on behalf of ClimateXChange. All rights reserved.

Cite this

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Nutritional strategies to reduce enteric methane emissions. / Rooke, JA; Miller, G A; Flockhart, JF; McDowell, MM; MacLeod, M.

Scotland's Rural College (SRUC), 2016. 46 p.

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

TY - BOOK

T1 - Nutritional strategies to reduce enteric methane emissions

AU - Rooke, JA

AU - Miller, G A

AU - Flockhart, JF

AU - McDowell, MM

AU - MacLeod, M

N1 - © Published by Scotland’s Rural College, 2016 on behalf of ClimateXChange. All rights reserved.

PY - 2016

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N2 - Methane (CH4) emissions from ruminants are responsible for approximately 50% of the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with agriculture in Scotland. Reducing the emissions intensity (EI; the amount of GHG emitted per unit of meat or milk produced) of ruminants is, therefore, key to reducing agriculturalemissions in Scotland. Scottish Government commissioned ClimateXChange to carry out a rapid evidence assessment for the effectiveness of probiotics, nitrates and high fat diets in addressing enteric fermentation as a source of GHG emissions.

AB - Methane (CH4) emissions from ruminants are responsible for approximately 50% of the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with agriculture in Scotland. Reducing the emissions intensity (EI; the amount of GHG emitted per unit of meat or milk produced) of ruminants is, therefore, key to reducing agriculturalemissions in Scotland. Scottish Government commissioned ClimateXChange to carry out a rapid evidence assessment for the effectiveness of probiotics, nitrates and high fat diets in addressing enteric fermentation as a source of GHG emissions.

UR - https://www.climatexchange.org.uk/research/projects/emissions-from-livestock-production/

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BT - Nutritional strategies to reduce enteric methane emissions

PB - Scotland's Rural College (SRUC)

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