Predicting the effect of rotation design on N, P, K balances on organic farms using the NDICEA model

LG Smith, D Tarsitano, CFE Topp, SK Jones, CL Gerrard, BD Pearce, AG Williams, CA Watson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)
5 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The dynamic model Nitrogen Dynamics in Crop rotations in Ecological Agriculture (NDICEA) was used to assess the nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) balance of long-term organic cropping trials and typical organic crop rotations on a range of soil types and rainfall zones in the UK. The measurements of soil N taken at each of the organic trial sites were also used to assess the performance of NDICEA. The modeled outputs compared well to recorded soil N levels, with relatively small error margins. NDICEA therefore seems to be a useful tool for UK organic farmers. The modeling of typical organic rotations has shown that positive N balances can be achieved, although negative N balances can occur under high rainfall conditions and on lighter soil types as a result of leaching. The analysis and modeling also showed that some organic cropping systems rely on imported sources of P and K to maintain an adequate balance and large deficits of both nutrients are apparent in stockless systems. Although the K deficits could be addressed through the buffering capacity of minerals, the amount available for crop uptake will depend on the type and amount of minerals present, current cropping and fertilization practices and the climatic environment. A P deficit represents a more fundamental problem for the maintenance of crop yields and the organic sector currently relies on mined sources of P which represents a fundamental conflict with the International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements organic principles.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)471 - 484
Number of pages14
JournalRenewable Agriculture and Food Systems
Volume31
DOIs
Publication statusPrint publication - 2015

Fingerprint

agriculture
farms
nitrogen
soil types
minerals
rain
buffering capacity
organic production
dynamic models
cropping systems
crop yield
soil
leaching
potassium
farmers
uptake mechanisms
phosphorus
nutrients
crops

Bibliographical note

1023396

Keywords

  • Crop rotation
  • Nutrients
  • Organic farming
  • Sustainability

Cite this

@article{3c25b595bdc44e87b0cd4e70b5aeb105,
title = "Predicting the effect of rotation design on N, P, K balances on organic farms using the NDICEA model",
abstract = "The dynamic model Nitrogen Dynamics in Crop rotations in Ecological Agriculture (NDICEA) was used to assess the nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) balance of long-term organic cropping trials and typical organic crop rotations on a range of soil types and rainfall zones in the UK. The measurements of soil N taken at each of the organic trial sites were also used to assess the performance of NDICEA. The modeled outputs compared well to recorded soil N levels, with relatively small error margins. NDICEA therefore seems to be a useful tool for UK organic farmers. The modeling of typical organic rotations has shown that positive N balances can be achieved, although negative N balances can occur under high rainfall conditions and on lighter soil types as a result of leaching. The analysis and modeling also showed that some organic cropping systems rely on imported sources of P and K to maintain an adequate balance and large deficits of both nutrients are apparent in stockless systems. Although the K deficits could be addressed through the buffering capacity of minerals, the amount available for crop uptake will depend on the type and amount of minerals present, current cropping and fertilization practices and the climatic environment. A P deficit represents a more fundamental problem for the maintenance of crop yields and the organic sector currently relies on mined sources of P which represents a fundamental conflict with the International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements organic principles.",
keywords = "Crop rotation, Nutrients, Organic farming, Sustainability",
author = "LG Smith and D Tarsitano and CFE Topp and SK Jones and CL Gerrard and BD Pearce and AG Williams and CA Watson",
note = "1023396",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1017/S1742170515000381",
language = "English",
volume = "31",
pages = "471 -- 484",
journal = "Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems",

}

Predicting the effect of rotation design on N, P, K balances on organic farms using the NDICEA model. / Smith, LG; Tarsitano, D; Topp, CFE; Jones, SK; Gerrard, CL; Pearce, BD; Williams, AG; Watson, CA.

In: Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems, Vol. 31, 2015, p. 471 - 484.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predicting the effect of rotation design on N, P, K balances on organic farms using the NDICEA model

AU - Smith, LG

AU - Tarsitano, D

AU - Topp, CFE

AU - Jones, SK

AU - Gerrard, CL

AU - Pearce, BD

AU - Williams, AG

AU - Watson, CA

N1 - 1023396

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - The dynamic model Nitrogen Dynamics in Crop rotations in Ecological Agriculture (NDICEA) was used to assess the nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) balance of long-term organic cropping trials and typical organic crop rotations on a range of soil types and rainfall zones in the UK. The measurements of soil N taken at each of the organic trial sites were also used to assess the performance of NDICEA. The modeled outputs compared well to recorded soil N levels, with relatively small error margins. NDICEA therefore seems to be a useful tool for UK organic farmers. The modeling of typical organic rotations has shown that positive N balances can be achieved, although negative N balances can occur under high rainfall conditions and on lighter soil types as a result of leaching. The analysis and modeling also showed that some organic cropping systems rely on imported sources of P and K to maintain an adequate balance and large deficits of both nutrients are apparent in stockless systems. Although the K deficits could be addressed through the buffering capacity of minerals, the amount available for crop uptake will depend on the type and amount of minerals present, current cropping and fertilization practices and the climatic environment. A P deficit represents a more fundamental problem for the maintenance of crop yields and the organic sector currently relies on mined sources of P which represents a fundamental conflict with the International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements organic principles.

AB - The dynamic model Nitrogen Dynamics in Crop rotations in Ecological Agriculture (NDICEA) was used to assess the nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) balance of long-term organic cropping trials and typical organic crop rotations on a range of soil types and rainfall zones in the UK. The measurements of soil N taken at each of the organic trial sites were also used to assess the performance of NDICEA. The modeled outputs compared well to recorded soil N levels, with relatively small error margins. NDICEA therefore seems to be a useful tool for UK organic farmers. The modeling of typical organic rotations has shown that positive N balances can be achieved, although negative N balances can occur under high rainfall conditions and on lighter soil types as a result of leaching. The analysis and modeling also showed that some organic cropping systems rely on imported sources of P and K to maintain an adequate balance and large deficits of both nutrients are apparent in stockless systems. Although the K deficits could be addressed through the buffering capacity of minerals, the amount available for crop uptake will depend on the type and amount of minerals present, current cropping and fertilization practices and the climatic environment. A P deficit represents a more fundamental problem for the maintenance of crop yields and the organic sector currently relies on mined sources of P which represents a fundamental conflict with the International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements organic principles.

KW - Crop rotation

KW - Nutrients

KW - Organic farming

KW - Sustainability

U2 - 10.1017/S1742170515000381

DO - 10.1017/S1742170515000381

M3 - Article

VL - 31

SP - 471

EP - 484

JO - Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems

JF - Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems

ER -