Rice polishings as an alternative to sugar cane molasses as a supplement with urea to low-quality forage diets for ruminants

D.C. Garcia, C.J. Newbold, H. Galbraith, J.H. Topps, X.B. Chen, J.A. Rooke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of including 14 g urea with either 75 g dry matter (DM) from sugar cane molasses (UM) or Colombian rice polishings (RP) at three levels, 68 (RP1), 137 (RP2) or 203 (RP3) g DM on grass hay DM intake and on rumen fermentation was investigated. An incomplete Latin-square design was used and each experimental period was divided into 12 days for adaptation to each diet followed by 9 days in metabolism cages when all measurements were made using five adult sheep. Pooled mean values for rumen metabolites (five samples per day) were calculated. Rumen pH was not affected by the nature of the supplements. Concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFA) (UM 92·8, RP1 84·2, RP2 86·4, and RP3 84·0 (s.e.d. 3·4) mmol/l) and lactate (UM 2·0, RP1 1/6, RP2 1/7, RP3 1/8 (s.e.d. 0·014) mmol/l) (UM v. RP, P < 0·05 and P < 0·10 respectively) were lower when RP were given, while concentration of branched and longer chain VFA (26·5, 34·0, 31·1 and 33·5 (s.e.d. 1·6) mmol/mol total VFA, UM v. RP, P < 0·01) and ammonia (98, 131, 141, 137 (s.e.d. 16·1) mg/l, UM v. RP, P < 0·05) were increased. Numbers of rumen protozoa (1·6, 3·2, 2·7, 3·3 (s.e.d. 0·75) × 105 per ml, UM v. RP, P < 0·20) tended to be higher 2 h after feeding when RP rather than UM were given. However, hay DM intake (1050, 960, 960, 880 (s.e.d. 45·3) g/day, UM v. RP, P < 0·05), and microbial protein supply (11·7, 9·3,11·1,10·8 (s.e.d. 0·59) g N per day, UM v. RP, P < 0·05), estimated from urinary purine excretion were reduced by feeding RP instead of UM. At the levels of inclusion tested RP did not increase the efficiency of rumen fermentation and were not as effective a supplement with urea as was molasses for a low-quality forage diet.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)85-92
Number of pages8
JournalAnimal Production
Volume56
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPrint publication - 1993

Fingerprint

forage quality
molasses
sugarcane
ruminants
urea
rice
diet
volatile fatty acids
rumen fermentation
dry matter intake
rumen
rumen protozoa
grass hay
microbial proteins
long chain fatty acids
purines
hay
lactates
cages
ammonia

Bibliographical note

Cited By :3

Export Date: 18 May 2019

Cite this

Garcia, D.C. ; Newbold, C.J. ; Galbraith, H. ; Topps, J.H. ; Chen, X.B. ; Rooke, J.A. / Rice polishings as an alternative to sugar cane molasses as a supplement with urea to low-quality forage diets for ruminants. In: Animal Production. 1993 ; Vol. 56, No. 1. pp. 85-92.
@article{c546cbf0bf7b4cb9829d7303e9adc17c,
title = "Rice polishings as an alternative to sugar cane molasses as a supplement with urea to low-quality forage diets for ruminants",
abstract = "The effect of including 14 g urea with either 75 g dry matter (DM) from sugar cane molasses (UM) or Colombian rice polishings (RP) at three levels, 68 (RP1), 137 (RP2) or 203 (RP3) g DM on grass hay DM intake and on rumen fermentation was investigated. An incomplete Latin-square design was used and each experimental period was divided into 12 days for adaptation to each diet followed by 9 days in metabolism cages when all measurements were made using five adult sheep. Pooled mean values for rumen metabolites (five samples per day) were calculated. Rumen pH was not affected by the nature of the supplements. Concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFA) (UM 92·8, RP1 84·2, RP2 86·4, and RP3 84·0 (s.e.d. 3·4) mmol/l) and lactate (UM 2·0, RP1 1/6, RP2 1/7, RP3 1/8 (s.e.d. 0·014) mmol/l) (UM v. RP, P < 0·05 and P < 0·10 respectively) were lower when RP were given, while concentration of branched and longer chain VFA (26·5, 34·0, 31·1 and 33·5 (s.e.d. 1·6) mmol/mol total VFA, UM v. RP, P < 0·01) and ammonia (98, 131, 141, 137 (s.e.d. 16·1) mg/l, UM v. RP, P < 0·05) were increased. Numbers of rumen protozoa (1·6, 3·2, 2·7, 3·3 (s.e.d. 0·75) × 105 per ml, UM v. RP, P < 0·20) tended to be higher 2 h after feeding when RP rather than UM were given. However, hay DM intake (1050, 960, 960, 880 (s.e.d. 45·3) g/day, UM v. RP, P < 0·05), and microbial protein supply (11·7, 9·3,11·1,10·8 (s.e.d. 0·59) g N per day, UM v. RP, P < 0·05), estimated from urinary purine excretion were reduced by feeding RP instead of UM. At the levels of inclusion tested RP did not increase the efficiency of rumen fermentation and were not as effective a supplement with urea as was molasses for a low-quality forage diet.",
author = "D.C. Garcia and C.J. Newbold and H. Galbraith and J.H. Topps and X.B. Chen and J.A. Rooke",
note = "Cited By :3 Export Date: 18 May 2019",
year = "1993",
doi = "10.1017/S0003356100006188",
language = "English",
volume = "56",
pages = "85--92",
journal = "Animal Production",
issn = "0003-3561",
number = "1",

}

Rice polishings as an alternative to sugar cane molasses as a supplement with urea to low-quality forage diets for ruminants. / Garcia, D.C.; Newbold, C.J.; Galbraith, H.; Topps, J.H.; Chen, X.B.; Rooke, J.A.

In: Animal Production, Vol. 56, No. 1, 1993, p. 85-92.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Rice polishings as an alternative to sugar cane molasses as a supplement with urea to low-quality forage diets for ruminants

AU - Garcia, D.C.

AU - Newbold, C.J.

AU - Galbraith, H.

AU - Topps, J.H.

AU - Chen, X.B.

AU - Rooke, J.A.

N1 - Cited By :3 Export Date: 18 May 2019

PY - 1993

Y1 - 1993

N2 - The effect of including 14 g urea with either 75 g dry matter (DM) from sugar cane molasses (UM) or Colombian rice polishings (RP) at three levels, 68 (RP1), 137 (RP2) or 203 (RP3) g DM on grass hay DM intake and on rumen fermentation was investigated. An incomplete Latin-square design was used and each experimental period was divided into 12 days for adaptation to each diet followed by 9 days in metabolism cages when all measurements were made using five adult sheep. Pooled mean values for rumen metabolites (five samples per day) were calculated. Rumen pH was not affected by the nature of the supplements. Concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFA) (UM 92·8, RP1 84·2, RP2 86·4, and RP3 84·0 (s.e.d. 3·4) mmol/l) and lactate (UM 2·0, RP1 1/6, RP2 1/7, RP3 1/8 (s.e.d. 0·014) mmol/l) (UM v. RP, P < 0·05 and P < 0·10 respectively) were lower when RP were given, while concentration of branched and longer chain VFA (26·5, 34·0, 31·1 and 33·5 (s.e.d. 1·6) mmol/mol total VFA, UM v. RP, P < 0·01) and ammonia (98, 131, 141, 137 (s.e.d. 16·1) mg/l, UM v. RP, P < 0·05) were increased. Numbers of rumen protozoa (1·6, 3·2, 2·7, 3·3 (s.e.d. 0·75) × 105 per ml, UM v. RP, P < 0·20) tended to be higher 2 h after feeding when RP rather than UM were given. However, hay DM intake (1050, 960, 960, 880 (s.e.d. 45·3) g/day, UM v. RP, P < 0·05), and microbial protein supply (11·7, 9·3,11·1,10·8 (s.e.d. 0·59) g N per day, UM v. RP, P < 0·05), estimated from urinary purine excretion were reduced by feeding RP instead of UM. At the levels of inclusion tested RP did not increase the efficiency of rumen fermentation and were not as effective a supplement with urea as was molasses for a low-quality forage diet.

AB - The effect of including 14 g urea with either 75 g dry matter (DM) from sugar cane molasses (UM) or Colombian rice polishings (RP) at three levels, 68 (RP1), 137 (RP2) or 203 (RP3) g DM on grass hay DM intake and on rumen fermentation was investigated. An incomplete Latin-square design was used and each experimental period was divided into 12 days for adaptation to each diet followed by 9 days in metabolism cages when all measurements were made using five adult sheep. Pooled mean values for rumen metabolites (five samples per day) were calculated. Rumen pH was not affected by the nature of the supplements. Concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFA) (UM 92·8, RP1 84·2, RP2 86·4, and RP3 84·0 (s.e.d. 3·4) mmol/l) and lactate (UM 2·0, RP1 1/6, RP2 1/7, RP3 1/8 (s.e.d. 0·014) mmol/l) (UM v. RP, P < 0·05 and P < 0·10 respectively) were lower when RP were given, while concentration of branched and longer chain VFA (26·5, 34·0, 31·1 and 33·5 (s.e.d. 1·6) mmol/mol total VFA, UM v. RP, P < 0·01) and ammonia (98, 131, 141, 137 (s.e.d. 16·1) mg/l, UM v. RP, P < 0·05) were increased. Numbers of rumen protozoa (1·6, 3·2, 2·7, 3·3 (s.e.d. 0·75) × 105 per ml, UM v. RP, P < 0·20) tended to be higher 2 h after feeding when RP rather than UM were given. However, hay DM intake (1050, 960, 960, 880 (s.e.d. 45·3) g/day, UM v. RP, P < 0·05), and microbial protein supply (11·7, 9·3,11·1,10·8 (s.e.d. 0·59) g N per day, UM v. RP, P < 0·05), estimated from urinary purine excretion were reduced by feeding RP instead of UM. At the levels of inclusion tested RP did not increase the efficiency of rumen fermentation and were not as effective a supplement with urea as was molasses for a low-quality forage diet.

U2 - 10.1017/S0003356100006188

DO - 10.1017/S0003356100006188

M3 - Article

VL - 56

SP - 85

EP - 92

JO - Animal Production

JF - Animal Production

SN - 0003-3561

IS - 1

ER -