Seagulls (Larus spp.) as vectors of salmonellae: An investigation into the range of serotypes and numbers of salmonellae in gull faeces

D. R. Fenlon*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Of 1242 samples of seagulls faeces examined, 12·9% were found to contain salmonellae. The number of positive samples was significantly higher (17–21%) near sewage outfalls. Twenty-seven serotypes were isolated, including a new serotype named Salmonella grampian. The range and frequency of serotypes carried by gulls was similar to those in the human population, suggesting sewage as a possible source of gull infection. The number of salmonellae found in positive samples was low (0·18−191 g−1 faeces). This was similar to the numbers found in sewage, 10−80 l−1, suggesting gulls may only carry infected material without infecting themselves. Antibiotic resistance in the isolates was low, only 21 showing resistance to the antibiotics tested, although most of these were determined by resistance transfer plasmids.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)195-202
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Hygiene
Volume86
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPrint publication - Apr 1981

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