Sensory evaluation and consumer acceptance of eggs from hens fed flax seed and 2 different antioxidants

Z Hayat, G Cherian, TN Pasha, FM Khattak, MA Jabbar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The sensory attributes and consumer acceptance of eggs from flax seed-fed hens were evaluated by trained and untrained panelists. Hens were fed diets containing 0% flax seed (control), 10% flax seed (flax), 10% flax seed + 100 IU/kg of vitamin E (flax + α-tocopherol), or 10% flax seed + 100 mg/kg of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) (flax + BHT). Fresh eggs collected within 24 h were hard-boiled, coded, and were offered to trained panelists in 4 testing sessions. Sensory traits evaluated were aroma, flavor, off-flavor, and overall difference. The trained panelists rated flax, flax + α-tocopherol, and flax + BHT eggs to be different from control eggs (P < 0.001). In a second study, sensory attributes were tested by untrained panelists. The majority (75 to 80%) of the panelists could not distinguish flax seed-fed versus control eggs for aroma and flavor. A consumer preference test was also conducted to gauge end-user response to flax seed-fed eggs. Consumer acceptance testing did not find any significant difference (P > 0.05) between control and flax seed-fed eggs. These results suggest that flax seed when incorporated at 10% in the layer diet can produce eggs that are acceptable to untrained panelists and consumers. However, trained panelists are able to detect differences in flavor, aroma, and off-flavor and overall difference in eggs from hens fed flax seed. Antioxidant supplementation (vitamin E, BHT) did not enhance the acceptability of flax seed-fed eggs by trained panelists.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2293 - 2298
Number of pages6
JournalPoultry Science
Volume89
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusFirst published - 2010

Fingerprint

consumer acceptance
linseed
sensory evaluation
hens
flax
antioxidants
odors
off flavors
tocopherols
vitamin E
flavor
testing
consumer preferences
gauges
sensory properties

Bibliographical note

2062160

Keywords

  • Butylated hydroxytoluene
  • Egg
  • Flax
  • Sensory
  • Vitamin E

Cite this

Hayat, Z ; Cherian, G ; Pasha, TN ; Khattak, FM ; Jabbar, MA. / Sensory evaluation and consumer acceptance of eggs from hens fed flax seed and 2 different antioxidants. In: Poultry Science. 2010 ; Vol. 89, No. 10. pp. 2293 - 2298.
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abstract = "The sensory attributes and consumer acceptance of eggs from flax seed-fed hens were evaluated by trained and untrained panelists. Hens were fed diets containing 0{\%} flax seed (control), 10{\%} flax seed (flax), 10{\%} flax seed + 100 IU/kg of vitamin E (flax + α-tocopherol), or 10{\%} flax seed + 100 mg/kg of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) (flax + BHT). Fresh eggs collected within 24 h were hard-boiled, coded, and were offered to trained panelists in 4 testing sessions. Sensory traits evaluated were aroma, flavor, off-flavor, and overall difference. The trained panelists rated flax, flax + α-tocopherol, and flax + BHT eggs to be different from control eggs (P < 0.001). In a second study, sensory attributes were tested by untrained panelists. The majority (75 to 80{\%}) of the panelists could not distinguish flax seed-fed versus control eggs for aroma and flavor. A consumer preference test was also conducted to gauge end-user response to flax seed-fed eggs. Consumer acceptance testing did not find any significant difference (P > 0.05) between control and flax seed-fed eggs. These results suggest that flax seed when incorporated at 10{\%} in the layer diet can produce eggs that are acceptable to untrained panelists and consumers. However, trained panelists are able to detect differences in flavor, aroma, and off-flavor and overall difference in eggs from hens fed flax seed. Antioxidant supplementation (vitamin E, BHT) did not enhance the acceptability of flax seed-fed eggs by trained panelists.",
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Sensory evaluation and consumer acceptance of eggs from hens fed flax seed and 2 different antioxidants. / Hayat, Z; Cherian, G; Pasha, TN; Khattak, FM; Jabbar, MA.

In: Poultry Science, Vol. 89, No. 10, 2010, p. 2293 - 2298.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Sensory evaluation and consumer acceptance of eggs from hens fed flax seed and 2 different antioxidants

AU - Hayat, Z

AU - Cherian, G

AU - Pasha, TN

AU - Khattak, FM

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N2 - The sensory attributes and consumer acceptance of eggs from flax seed-fed hens were evaluated by trained and untrained panelists. Hens were fed diets containing 0% flax seed (control), 10% flax seed (flax), 10% flax seed + 100 IU/kg of vitamin E (flax + α-tocopherol), or 10% flax seed + 100 mg/kg of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) (flax + BHT). Fresh eggs collected within 24 h were hard-boiled, coded, and were offered to trained panelists in 4 testing sessions. Sensory traits evaluated were aroma, flavor, off-flavor, and overall difference. The trained panelists rated flax, flax + α-tocopherol, and flax + BHT eggs to be different from control eggs (P < 0.001). In a second study, sensory attributes were tested by untrained panelists. The majority (75 to 80%) of the panelists could not distinguish flax seed-fed versus control eggs for aroma and flavor. A consumer preference test was also conducted to gauge end-user response to flax seed-fed eggs. Consumer acceptance testing did not find any significant difference (P > 0.05) between control and flax seed-fed eggs. These results suggest that flax seed when incorporated at 10% in the layer diet can produce eggs that are acceptable to untrained panelists and consumers. However, trained panelists are able to detect differences in flavor, aroma, and off-flavor and overall difference in eggs from hens fed flax seed. Antioxidant supplementation (vitamin E, BHT) did not enhance the acceptability of flax seed-fed eggs by trained panelists.

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KW - Vitamin E

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