Streptococcus canis are a single population infecting multiple animal hosts despite the diversity of the universally present M-like protein SCM

Marcos D Pinho*, G Foster, Constança Pomba, Miguel P Machado, JL Baily, T Kuiken, Jose Melo-Cristino, Mario Ramirez

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Streptococcus canis is an animal pathogen which occasionally causes infections in humans. The S. canis M-like protein (SCM) encoded by the scm gene, is its best characterized virulence factor but previous studies suggested it could be absent in a substantial fraction of isolates. We studied the distribution and variability of the scm gene in 188 S. canis isolates recovered from companion animals (n = 152), wild animal species (n = 20), and humans (n = 14). Multilocus sequence typing, including the first characterization of wildlife isolates, showed that the same lineages are present in all animal hosts, raising the possibility of extensive circulation between species. Whole-genome analysis revealed that emm-like genes found previously in S. canis correspond to divergent scm genes, indicating that what was previously believed to correspond to two genes is in fact the same scm locus. We designed primers allowing for the first time the successful amplification of the scm gene in all isolates. Analysis of the scm sequences identified 12 distinct types, which could be divided into two clusters: group I (76%, n = 142) and group II (24%, n = 46) sharing little sequence similarity. The predicted group I SCM showed extensive similarity with each other outside of the N-terminal hypervariable region and a conserved IgG binding domain. This domain was absent from group II SCM variants found in isolates previously thought to lack the scm gene, which also showed greater amino acid variability. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the possible host interacting partners of the group II SCM variants and their role in virulence.
Original languageEnglish
Article number631
Number of pages10
JournalFrontiers in Microbiology
Volume10
Early online date29 Mar 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPrint publication - 2019

Fingerprint

Streptococcus canis
animals
proteins
genes
virulence
animal pathogens
wild animals
pets
wildlife
sequence analysis
polymerase chain reaction
loci
amino acids
genome

Keywords

  • Streptococcus canis
  • Multilocus sequence typing
  • M-like protein (SCM) gene
  • Wildlife
  • Genome

Cite this

Pinho, Marcos D ; Foster, G ; Pomba, Constança ; Machado, Miguel P ; Baily, JL ; Kuiken, T ; Melo-Cristino, Jose ; Ramirez, Mario. / Streptococcus canis are a single population infecting multiple animal hosts despite the diversity of the universally present M-like protein SCM. In: Frontiers in Microbiology. 2019 ; Vol. 10.
@article{846705befaec469b95cf73e87d1c790b,
title = "Streptococcus canis are a single population infecting multiple animal hosts despite the diversity of the universally present M-like protein SCM",
abstract = "Streptococcus canis is an animal pathogen which occasionally causes infections in humans. The S. canis M-like protein (SCM) encoded by the scm gene, is its best characterized virulence factor but previous studies suggested it could be absent in a substantial fraction of isolates. We studied the distribution and variability of the scm gene in 188 S. canis isolates recovered from companion animals (n = 152), wild animal species (n = 20), and humans (n = 14). Multilocus sequence typing, including the first characterization of wildlife isolates, showed that the same lineages are present in all animal hosts, raising the possibility of extensive circulation between species. Whole-genome analysis revealed that emm-like genes found previously in S. canis correspond to divergent scm genes, indicating that what was previously believed to correspond to two genes is in fact the same scm locus. We designed primers allowing for the first time the successful amplification of the scm gene in all isolates. Analysis of the scm sequences identified 12 distinct types, which could be divided into two clusters: group I (76{\%}, n = 142) and group II (24{\%}, n = 46) sharing little sequence similarity. The predicted group I SCM showed extensive similarity with each other outside of the N-terminal hypervariable region and a conserved IgG binding domain. This domain was absent from group II SCM variants found in isolates previously thought to lack the scm gene, which also showed greater amino acid variability. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the possible host interacting partners of the group II SCM variants and their role in virulence.",
keywords = "Streptococcus canis, Multilocus sequence typing, M-like protein (SCM) gene, Wildlife, Genome",
author = "Pinho, {Marcos D} and G Foster and Constan{\cc}a Pomba and Machado, {Miguel P} and JL Baily and T Kuiken and Jose Melo-Cristino and Mario Ramirez",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.3389/fmicb.2019.00631",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
journal = "Frontiers in Microbiology",
issn = "1664-302X",
publisher = "Frontiers Media",

}

Streptococcus canis are a single population infecting multiple animal hosts despite the diversity of the universally present M-like protein SCM. / Pinho, Marcos D; Foster, G; Pomba, Constança; Machado, Miguel P; Baily, JL; Kuiken, T; Melo-Cristino, Jose; Ramirez, Mario.

In: Frontiers in Microbiology, Vol. 10, 631, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Streptococcus canis are a single population infecting multiple animal hosts despite the diversity of the universally present M-like protein SCM

AU - Pinho, Marcos D

AU - Foster, G

AU - Pomba, Constança

AU - Machado, Miguel P

AU - Baily, JL

AU - Kuiken, T

AU - Melo-Cristino, Jose

AU - Ramirez, Mario

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Streptococcus canis is an animal pathogen which occasionally causes infections in humans. The S. canis M-like protein (SCM) encoded by the scm gene, is its best characterized virulence factor but previous studies suggested it could be absent in a substantial fraction of isolates. We studied the distribution and variability of the scm gene in 188 S. canis isolates recovered from companion animals (n = 152), wild animal species (n = 20), and humans (n = 14). Multilocus sequence typing, including the first characterization of wildlife isolates, showed that the same lineages are present in all animal hosts, raising the possibility of extensive circulation between species. Whole-genome analysis revealed that emm-like genes found previously in S. canis correspond to divergent scm genes, indicating that what was previously believed to correspond to two genes is in fact the same scm locus. We designed primers allowing for the first time the successful amplification of the scm gene in all isolates. Analysis of the scm sequences identified 12 distinct types, which could be divided into two clusters: group I (76%, n = 142) and group II (24%, n = 46) sharing little sequence similarity. The predicted group I SCM showed extensive similarity with each other outside of the N-terminal hypervariable region and a conserved IgG binding domain. This domain was absent from group II SCM variants found in isolates previously thought to lack the scm gene, which also showed greater amino acid variability. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the possible host interacting partners of the group II SCM variants and their role in virulence.

AB - Streptococcus canis is an animal pathogen which occasionally causes infections in humans. The S. canis M-like protein (SCM) encoded by the scm gene, is its best characterized virulence factor but previous studies suggested it could be absent in a substantial fraction of isolates. We studied the distribution and variability of the scm gene in 188 S. canis isolates recovered from companion animals (n = 152), wild animal species (n = 20), and humans (n = 14). Multilocus sequence typing, including the first characterization of wildlife isolates, showed that the same lineages are present in all animal hosts, raising the possibility of extensive circulation between species. Whole-genome analysis revealed that emm-like genes found previously in S. canis correspond to divergent scm genes, indicating that what was previously believed to correspond to two genes is in fact the same scm locus. We designed primers allowing for the first time the successful amplification of the scm gene in all isolates. Analysis of the scm sequences identified 12 distinct types, which could be divided into two clusters: group I (76%, n = 142) and group II (24%, n = 46) sharing little sequence similarity. The predicted group I SCM showed extensive similarity with each other outside of the N-terminal hypervariable region and a conserved IgG binding domain. This domain was absent from group II SCM variants found in isolates previously thought to lack the scm gene, which also showed greater amino acid variability. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the possible host interacting partners of the group II SCM variants and their role in virulence.

KW - Streptococcus canis

KW - Multilocus sequence typing

KW - M-like protein (SCM) gene

KW - Wildlife

KW - Genome

U2 - 10.3389/fmicb.2019.00631

DO - 10.3389/fmicb.2019.00631

M3 - Article

C2 - 30984150

VL - 10

JO - Frontiers in Microbiology

JF - Frontiers in Microbiology

SN - 1664-302X

M1 - 631

ER -