STUDIES ON THE PRODUCTIVITY OF FIRST YEAR LEY GRASS WHEN CUT AT DIFFERENT STAGES OF GROWTH, ENSILED AND FED TO BEEF CATTLE

T. L. Dodsworth*, W. H. McK. Campbell

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A number of feeding trials, designed to determine the fattening value of grass silage for beef cattle, have been carried out during the last four years in Aberdeenshire. A general account of these trials has been published, (3, 4) and a detailed account of some of the results of Trial No. 9 is in the press (5). The chemical analysis required in Trial 9 was performed by Dr. A. J. G. Bamett, Department of Biological Chemistry, Univeristy of Aberdeen. Some aspects of these analytical results have already been published (1, 2). During two of these trials, carried out on the Duthie Craibstone Farm, data was eollected during the silage making periods as well as for the actual feeding trials. It was therefore possible to relate the liveweight increase obtained in the feeding trials to the acreage of grass cut. This has been done and the results obtained are now presented. Both trials were designed to determine the fattening value of silage made from grass cut at three different stages of maturity. In both cases the acreage of grass available had to be cut a number of times in order to obtain the tonnage of silage required for the feeding trials. The results obtained therefore represent the full seasonal yields per acre of grass, grass eilage and liveweight increase which can be obtained when first year ley grass is cut at difFerent stages of growth, and when different cutting frequencies are practised. In both trials a control group of cattle was fed on swedes and oat straw. A comparison can then be made of the stock carrying and fattening capacities of swedes and silage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)151-159
Number of pages9
JournalGrass and Forage Science
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPrint publication - Dec 1952

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