Sulfate and hydroxychloride trace minerals in poultry diets - comparative effects on egg production and quality in laying hens, and growth performance and oxidative stress response in broilers

Oluyinka A. Olukosi*, Sandra J.A. Van Kuijk, Yanming Han

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Two experiments investigated the effect of sulfate and hydroxychloride trace minerals (TM), Zn, Cu, and Mn, in laying hens and broiler chickens. In Expt. 1, Lohmann Brown pullets (total of 1,344) at 21 wk of age were used for a 24-wk experiment. Each of the two treatments had 32 replicates with 21 hens per replicate. At 45 wk of age, three eggs per cage were randomly selected and used for internal quality assessment. In Expt. 2, Ross 308 broilers (total of 1,080) were allocated to two treatments. Each treatment had 30 replicates with 15 chicks per replicate. On day 28, after weighing, three birds were randomly selected from 15 randomly selected pens per treatment. The birds were euthanized and blood was collected for analysis for uric acid, C-reactive protein and methylmalonic acid. Samples were also taken from pectoralis muscle of each chicken and analyzed for mRNA expression of protein synthesis or hydrolysis genes. On day 35, 7 birds per pen were used for carcass evaluation. In Expt. 1, egg weight was greater (P < 0.01) in birds receiving sulfate TM from week 16 (of experiment) onwards whereas the percentage of cracked eggs was lower (P < 0.01) in hens receiving hydroxychloride TM. Percentage hen-day production tended to be greater (P < 0.10) in hens receiving hydroxychloride TM in weeks 4 to 8 only. In Expt. 2, birds receiving hydroxychloride TM had greater (P < 0.05) weight gain and tended to have greater (P < 0.10) feed intake on day 35. Expression of the gene, PSMA1, was lower (P < 0.05) whereas plasma level of uric acid and methyl malonic acid tended to be lower (P < 0.10) in birds receiving hydroxychloride TM. It was concluded that hydroxychloride TM reduced egg loss in hens at peak production and that improved growth performance response in broilers can be partly explained by reduction in proteolytic activities in the pectoralis muscle and greater resilience to oxidative stress.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4961-4971
Number of pages11
JournalPoultry Science
Volume98
Issue number10
Early online date10 May 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPrint publication - 1 Oct 2019

Keywords

  • Broiler
  • Hydroxychloride
  • Laying hen
  • Oxidative stress
  • Trace mineral

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