The application of medical informatics to the veterinary management programs at companion animal practices in Alberta, Canada: A case study

R. M. Anholt*, J. Berezowski, K. MacLean, M. L. Russell, I. Jamal, C. Stephen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Companion animals closely share their domestic environment with people and have the potential to, act as sources of zoonotic diseases. They also have the potential to be sentinels of infectious and noninfectious, diseases. With the exception of rabies, there has been minimal ongoing surveillance of, companion animals in Canada. We developed customized data extraction software, the University of, Calgary Data Extraction Program (UCDEP), to automatically extract and warehouse the electronic, medical records (EMR) from participating private veterinary practices to make them available for, disease surveillance and knowledge creation for evidence-based practice. It was not possible to build, generic data extraction software; the UCDEP required customization to meet the specific software, capabilities of the veterinary practices. The UCDEP, tailored to the participating veterinary practices', management software, was capable of extracting data from the EMR with greater than 99%, completeness and accuracy. The experiences of the people developing and using the UCDEP and the, quality of the extracted data were evaluated. The electronic medical record data stored in the data, warehouse may be a valuable resource for surveillance and evidence-based medical research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)165-174
Number of pages10
JournalPreventive Veterinary Medicine
Volume113
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPrint publication - 1 Feb 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Companion animals
  • Data extraction
  • Data quality
  • Electronic medical record
  • Informatics
  • Surveillance

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