THE EFFECT OF COMPANION GRASS AND SEED RATE ON THE PRODUCTIVITY OF A TALL‐FESCUE SWARD

J. Frame*, I. V. Hunt

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of sowing from 10 to 50 lb/acre of tall‐fescue seed on plant establishment and on the annual and seasonal distribution of DM yield of tall fescue and its companion grasses were measured through two growing seasons. Increasing the seed rate increased plant numbers per unit area and decreased per cent establishment. Adding Scots timothy as a companion grass depressed both plant number and per cent establishment. S37 cocksfoot and New Zealand perennial ryegrass reduced both still further. Total annual dry‐matter production was relatively unaffected by varying either the seed rate or the companion grass. The contribution of tall fescue to total production was highest when sown alone and was successively reduced by timothy, perennial ryegrass and cocksfoot. When sown alone there were only slight differences in contribution of tall fescue due to seed rate. With any companion grass the contribution from tall fescue increased with increasing seed rate. Early growth was not reduced by modifying seed rate but was reduced by all the companion grasses. It is concluded that increasing the seed rate of tall fescue above 30 lb is not justified, that Scots timothy can be sown at 3 lb/acre with tall fescue without affecting total production or early growth of the mixture, with the advantages of control of unsown species and improved palatability of the herbage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)330-335
Number of pages6
JournalGrass and Forage Science
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPrint publication - Sep 1964

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