THE EFFECT OF WINTER GRAZING BY SHEEP ON SPRING AND EARLY SUMMER PASTURE PRODUCTION

J. Frame*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies were made in S.W. Scotland of the effect of winter grazing (October to March) by sheep on subsequent spring and early summer pasture production from a sward in its first harvest year and from a permanent pasture. Averaged over the two swards, DM yields in April, May and June were reduced by 38%, 8% and 5%, respectively, as a result of various times and frequencies of grazing, compared with no grazing. Reductions were greatest after grazings in the January to March period, especially grazings involving the month of March. In a trial in which fertilizer N was used to compensate for March grazing, 50 kg NJha raised DM yields in April to the level of those from no grazing, while only 15 kg NJha were needed to raise June yields to parity. Controlled winter grazing of sheep and the use of fertilizer N to restore production losses after early spring grazing are justified.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)167-171
Number of pages5
JournalGrass and Forage Science
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPrint publication - Jun 1970

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