The genetic diversity of UK, US and Australian cultivars of Triticum aestivum measured by DArT markers and considered by genome

J. White, J.R. Law, I. MacKay, K.J. Chalmers, J.S.C. Smith, A. Kilian, W. Powell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

77 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The genetic diversity of UK, US and Australian wheat varieties over the period of modern plant breeding is estimated using diversity array technology markers. Diversity is assessed by both genetic distance between varieties, by AMOVA and as the volumes of multi-dimensional convex hulls estimated from principal co-ordinate analysis. At the whole genome level the three populations are genetically distinct; this is also true of the B genome. However, the US and Australian D genomes are found to occupy the same region of diversity space and the A genomes for these countries are partially overlapping. The use of high-density genotyping with a common marker set allows an unprecedented direct comparison between the diversities of the national populations, between individual genomes and the fluctuation of diversity over time. The highest genetic diversity amongst varieties is reported in the Australian population followed by the US, which in turn is more diverse than the UK. However the average diversity of loci is higher in the US set than in the Australian. Non-random fluctuations in genetic diversity over time are observed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)439-453
Number of pages15
JournalTheoretical and Applied Genetics
Volume116
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPrint publication - 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Triticum
Triticum aestivum
Genome
genetic variation
genome
cultivars
Population
plant breeding
hulls
genotyping
genetic distance
Technology
loci
wheat

Bibliographical note

Cited By :73

Export Date: 31 March 2019

Cite this

White, J. ; Law, J.R. ; MacKay, I. ; Chalmers, K.J. ; Smith, J.S.C. ; Kilian, A. ; Powell, W. / The genetic diversity of UK, US and Australian cultivars of Triticum aestivum measured by DArT markers and considered by genome. In: Theoretical and Applied Genetics. 2008 ; Vol. 116, No. 3. pp. 439-453.
@article{0b947195c3684115b8eb8b2720bbab9f,
title = "The genetic diversity of UK, US and Australian cultivars of Triticum aestivum measured by DArT markers and considered by genome",
abstract = "The genetic diversity of UK, US and Australian wheat varieties over the period of modern plant breeding is estimated using diversity array technology markers. Diversity is assessed by both genetic distance between varieties, by AMOVA and as the volumes of multi-dimensional convex hulls estimated from principal co-ordinate analysis. At the whole genome level the three populations are genetically distinct; this is also true of the B genome. However, the US and Australian D genomes are found to occupy the same region of diversity space and the A genomes for these countries are partially overlapping. The use of high-density genotyping with a common marker set allows an unprecedented direct comparison between the diversities of the national populations, between individual genomes and the fluctuation of diversity over time. The highest genetic diversity amongst varieties is reported in the Australian population followed by the US, which in turn is more diverse than the UK. However the average diversity of loci is higher in the US set than in the Australian. Non-random fluctuations in genetic diversity over time are observed.",
author = "J. White and J.R. Law and I. MacKay and K.J. Chalmers and J.S.C. Smith and A. Kilian and W. Powell",
note = "Cited By :73 Export Date: 31 March 2019",
year = "2008",
doi = "10.1007/s00122-007-0681-3",
language = "English",
volume = "116",
pages = "439--453",
journal = "Theoretical And Applied Genetics",
issn = "0040-5752",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "3",

}

The genetic diversity of UK, US and Australian cultivars of Triticum aestivum measured by DArT markers and considered by genome. / White, J.; Law, J.R.; MacKay, I.; Chalmers, K.J.; Smith, J.S.C.; Kilian, A.; Powell, W.

In: Theoretical and Applied Genetics, Vol. 116, No. 3, 2008, p. 439-453.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The genetic diversity of UK, US and Australian cultivars of Triticum aestivum measured by DArT markers and considered by genome

AU - White, J.

AU - Law, J.R.

AU - MacKay, I.

AU - Chalmers, K.J.

AU - Smith, J.S.C.

AU - Kilian, A.

AU - Powell, W.

N1 - Cited By :73 Export Date: 31 March 2019

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - The genetic diversity of UK, US and Australian wheat varieties over the period of modern plant breeding is estimated using diversity array technology markers. Diversity is assessed by both genetic distance between varieties, by AMOVA and as the volumes of multi-dimensional convex hulls estimated from principal co-ordinate analysis. At the whole genome level the three populations are genetically distinct; this is also true of the B genome. However, the US and Australian D genomes are found to occupy the same region of diversity space and the A genomes for these countries are partially overlapping. The use of high-density genotyping with a common marker set allows an unprecedented direct comparison between the diversities of the national populations, between individual genomes and the fluctuation of diversity over time. The highest genetic diversity amongst varieties is reported in the Australian population followed by the US, which in turn is more diverse than the UK. However the average diversity of loci is higher in the US set than in the Australian. Non-random fluctuations in genetic diversity over time are observed.

AB - The genetic diversity of UK, US and Australian wheat varieties over the period of modern plant breeding is estimated using diversity array technology markers. Diversity is assessed by both genetic distance between varieties, by AMOVA and as the volumes of multi-dimensional convex hulls estimated from principal co-ordinate analysis. At the whole genome level the three populations are genetically distinct; this is also true of the B genome. However, the US and Australian D genomes are found to occupy the same region of diversity space and the A genomes for these countries are partially overlapping. The use of high-density genotyping with a common marker set allows an unprecedented direct comparison between the diversities of the national populations, between individual genomes and the fluctuation of diversity over time. The highest genetic diversity amongst varieties is reported in the Australian population followed by the US, which in turn is more diverse than the UK. However the average diversity of loci is higher in the US set than in the Australian. Non-random fluctuations in genetic diversity over time are observed.

U2 - 10.1007/s00122-007-0681-3

DO - 10.1007/s00122-007-0681-3

M3 - Article

VL - 116

SP - 439

EP - 453

JO - Theoretical And Applied Genetics

JF - Theoretical And Applied Genetics

SN - 0040-5752

IS - 3

ER -