The use of molecular diagnostics to investigate the epidemiology of potato diseases: Presented as a keynote address at the 15th Biennial Conference of the Australasian Plant Pathology Society, 26-29 September 2005, Geelong

A. K. Lees*, S. J. Wale, P. Van De Graaf, J. L. Brierley

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In recent years, quantitative molecular diagnostic assays based on real-time PCR have been developed for many pests and pathogens of potato. In addition, simple sequence repeat markers have been developed and used to track isolates of Phytophthora infestans. These diagnostic assays are now being used as tools to study unresolved questions in the epidemiology of potato diseases including late blight, powdery scab and black dot. Examples of various investigations designed to examine the relative contribution of seed and soil-borne inoculum in causing black dot and powdery scab on progeny tubers, the effect of environmental factors on the incidence and severity of powdery scab and the survival of asexual and sexual inoculum of P. infestans in soil are described. Consideration is given to the development of appropriate diagnostic assays, their use in conjunction with relevant and robust sampling techniques, and the interpretation of results to inform disease risk assessment and control strategies through industry collaboration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)449-455
Number of pages7
JournalAustralasian Plant Pathology
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPrint publication - 14 Dec 2005

Keywords

  • Black dot
  • Inoculum
  • PCR
  • Powdery scab
  • Real-time PCR
  • Risk assessment
  • Seed-borne
  • Soilborne

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