Understanding the cross-talk between human microbiota and gastrointestinal cancer for developing potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers

Sheetal Kashyap, Soumya Pal, Gourav Chandan, Vipin Saini, Sasanka Chakrabarti, Neeraj K. Saini, Amit Mittal, Vijay Kumar Thakur, Adesh K. Saini*, Reena V. Saini*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The interaction between gut microbes and gastrointestinal (GI) tract carcinogenesis has always attracted researchers’ attention to identify therapeutic targets or potential prognostic biomarkers. Various studies have suggested that the microbiota do show inflammation and immune dysregulation, which led to carcinogenesis in GI tract. In this review, we have focused on the role of microbes present in the gut, intestine, or faeces in GI tract cancers, including esophageal cancer, gastric cancer, and colorectal cancer. Herein, we have discussed the importance of the microbes and their metabolites, which could serve as diagnostic biomarkers for cancer detection, especially in the early stage, and prognostic markers. To maximize the effect of the treatment strategies, an accurate evaluation of the prognosis is imperative for clinicians. There is a vast difference in the microbiota profiles within a population and across the populations depending upon age, diet, lifestyle, genetic makeup, use of antibiotics, and environmental factors. Therefore, the diagnostic efficiency of the microbial markers needs to be further validated. A deeper understanding of the GI cancer and the host microbiota is needed to acquire pivotal information about disease status.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSeminars in Cancer Biology
Early online date8 May 2021
DOIs
Publication statusFirst published - 8 May 2021

Keywords

  • Biomarker
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Gastrointestinal cancer
  • Metabolites
  • Microbiota

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Understanding the cross-talk between human microbiota and gastrointestinal cancer for developing potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this