Use of carbohydrate-directed enzymes for the potential exploitation of sugarcane bagasse to obtain value-added biotechnological products

Amanda Cristina Campos Antoniêto, Karoline Maria Vieira Nogueira, Vanessa Mendes, David Batista Maués, Letícia Harumi Oshiquiri, Hermano Zenaide-Neto, Renato Graciano de Paula, James Gaffey, Meisam Tabatabaei, Vijai Kumar Gupta*, Roberto Nascimento Silva

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)
12 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Microorganisms, such as fungi and bacteria, are crucial players in the production of enzymatic cocktails for biomass hydrolysis or the bioconversion of plant biomass into products with industrial relevance. The biotechnology industry can exploit lignocellulosic biomass for the production of high-value chemicals. The generation of biotechnological products from lignocellulosic feedstock presents several bottlenecks, including low efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis, high cost of enzymes, and limitations on microbe metabolic performance. Genetic engineering offers a route for developing improved microbial strains for biotechnological applications in high-value product biosynthesis. Sugarcane bagasse, for example, is an agro-industrial waste that is abundantly produced in sugar and first-generation processing plants. Here, we review the potential conversion of its feedstock into relevant industrial products via microbial production and discuss the advances that have been made in improving strains for biotechnological applications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)456-471
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Journal of Biological Macromolecules
Volume221
Early online date15 Sept 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPrint publication - 30 Nov 2022

Bibliographical note

Copyright © 2022 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • CRISPR/Cas
  • High-value chemicals
  • Lignocellulosic feedstock
  • Metabolic engineering
  • Sugarcane bagasse

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